Electric Range Install

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  #1  
Old 06-30-04, 09:12 PM
NewandImproved
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Electric Range Install

Very simple question but thats the stage I am at.

I am installing a new electric range. The old one was connected to the wall at a transfer box. There was an exposed copper wire that was the ground. A black wire, a white wire and a red wire. All were connected to the corresponding wire from the stove and capped.

My new stove will accept either a three plug or four plug interface.

Can someone point me to the product I need to make my stove work? I have been to HomeDepot and I checked out 50amp 220v connectors and believe thats all I need to attach the wires running from the wall to in order to have my plug. I just want to make sure! For instance if I hook up the three plug what do I do with the copper wire from the wall!
 
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Old 07-01-04, 01:41 AM
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connect all 4 wires

If you have all 4 wires in the wall, and all 4 wires in the stove, then by all means connect them all with corresponding colors (green being equivalent to bare for the grounding wire). You should be using a NEMA 14-50R style outlet and a NEMA 14-50P style plug.

Here is a wiring diagram for NEMA type 14 receptacles:<br>
<img src="http://phil.ipal.org/electric/nema-14-wiring.gif">
 
  #3  
Old 07-01-04, 01:45 AM
doingitmyself
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First, you need to verify that the circuit is ran off a 50 amp breaker (if this is the nameplate rating of the range). Go back to the panel and check the ampacity of the breaker. (It's probably 50 amps). Also, check the nameplate current rating on the range. This can be located anywhere on the inside the oven door, on the back of the range, etc. Tell the folks here everything written on this nameplate, ex. wattage, in kW, voltage, such as 120/240 (maybe 110/220), etc. Hopefully, it will state specifically the amount of current, in amps, it requires.

I'm assuming that this range operates on both 120 and 240 (120/240). That is, the heating elements require 220, and the timer, lights, etc use 120, and that it requires a 50 amp breaker.

If this is the case, then you need a 50-A 120/240 receptacle which accepts 4 wires. You'll also need the 4-prong plug for the range.

The four wires coming out of the recepatacle box (in the wall) are correct for the 4-wire receptacle. Black and Red will provide the 240, and will connect to terminals usually marked Y1/Y2, and the white is the neutral, which will provide 120. This connects to a terminal usually marked W (or N, for neutral). The ground (bare wire) will connect as usual, to the green screw on the receptacle.

I'm surprised that the Home Depot guys weren'tof more assistance, but you came to the right place anyway. Winnie, John and others will assist you if I turn out to be wrong about this.

-Terry

Post back BEFORE you do anything and provide the info requested. This will allow the other folks to be of more help, and will also allow them to pick out the errors of my ways
 
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Old 07-01-04, 01:52 AM
doingitmyself
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Originally Posted by Skapare
If you have all 4 wires in the wall, and all 4 wires in the stove, then by all means connect them all with corresponding colors (green being equivalent to bare for the grounding wire). You should be using a NEMA 14-50R style outlet and a NEMA 14-50P style plug.

Here is a wiring diagram for NEMA type 14 receptacles:<br>
<img src="http://phil.ipal.org/electric/nema-14-wiring.gif">
geesh, I hope he understands all those diagrams. Help me out here: is the 14-50R the 50 amp range plug/receptacle config? What does the "14" signify?

-Terry

ps: I'm learning too
 
  #5  
Old 07-01-04, 02:15 AM
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Nema 14

The "14" refers to the specific <a href="http://nema.org/">NEMA</a> receptacle/plug standard category for a 125/250 volt single phase 3-pole (one of them being neutral) 4-wire (one of them being equipment ground) receptacles/plugs. The number is followed by the amperage plus R for receptacle or P for plug, such as NEMA 14-50R. Other numbers include NEMA 5-15R for the traditional 120 volt grounded outlet, NEMA 6-20P for a 20 amp 240 volt plug as might be found on a heavy duty window air conditioner, and NEMA 16-60R for a 60 amp 208 volt three-phase ungrounded outlet.

The view on the diagrams is looking at the receptacle front. The plug would be a reverse view.
 
  #6  
Old 07-01-04, 02:46 AM
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NEMA 10 (the ungrounded)

Here is a corresponding wiring diagram for NEMA type 10 receptacles, which used to be the norm for an electric stove:<br>
<img src="http://phil.ipal.org/electric/nema-10-wiring.gif">
 
  #7  
Old 07-01-04, 05:08 PM
NewandImproved
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Many thanks

Thanks for the information and confidence boost. I showed my wife this thread and now she has the confidence to let me do the work
 
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