Adding a receptacle - 3 feeds coming in?

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Old 07-01-04, 07:56 AM
T
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Adding a receptacle - 3 feeds coming in?

I am adding a receptacle to my bathroom. I already ran the feed for it via the attic. I'm getting power from the existing receptacle. The existing receptacle has two feeds coming into it (now three counting the new one). Is it against code to have three seperate wires coming into one box? If it is, how would you get around this situation?

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Old 07-01-04, 08:27 AM
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Having three cables in a box isn't against code as long as the box is large enough, but not GFCI protecting a bathroom outlet is against code (and very dangerous). Is the existing receptacle in the bathroom and GFCI protected? Code also requires a 20A GFCI protected receptacle circuit with an outlet adjacent to the washbasins. No other fixtures (other than bathroom outlets) may be on this circuit. So I don't believe that extending the circuit in the manner you are describing is up to code unless the existing receptacle is already in the bath and GFCI protected. If you are adding a receptacle to a bath that has not had one before, then run a new feed from the panel.
 
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Old 07-01-04, 10:23 AM
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tbird, if you want to explore this further, tell us the size of the box, either in cubic inches as stamped on the back of the box, or as height/width/depth measurements. Then tell us if all three cables are 12/2, or something else.

Everything Scott said is true, so make sure you're good with the code as he instructed.
 
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Old 07-01-04, 11:21 AM
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Ok here's the deal. I'm 99% sure everything that's wired in the bathroom (Shower light, Fan / Light, Lights, and Receptacle) are wired to a 15AMP circuit. I will double check that when I get home from work to be 100% though.

Currenlty there is only one receptacle and I'm 99% sure it's not GFCI (there is no button to reset that's why I'm saying that). I'm also 99% that the two feeds going into that receptacle are 12 awg. The new wire I bought is also 12 awg. So there will be three 12 awg wires tying into this box. I was thinking of replacing the current one with the new GFCI that I bought and then just using that one for the one new (since all outlets after a GFCI will have GFCI protection) but I don't think the box will be big enough.

As you can see there are numerous things wrong that conflict with what you said.
 
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Old 07-01-04, 11:52 AM
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Most receptacles that are GFCI protected do not have a reset button. Rather they are protected by an upstream GFCI.

Tell us the year in which the house was constructed, or last rewired. Codes and standard practices change over time. The year will help us identify what you have.
 
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Old 07-01-04, 12:26 PM
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John, the house was built in '69. I think whoever did the wiring was stoned at the time.. It is VERY weird the things that are on the same circuit. When I wired up my fan in my living room I turned off the breaker for the receptacle I was tying into. This same breaker controlled:

Garage Door
Garage Lights
Kitchen Lights
Hall Light
Receptacle

And possible some other stuff. I was able to listen to the radio in the same room (receptacle wasn't tied into the others that were in the same room).
 
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Old 07-02-04, 03:42 PM
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sounds like someone tapped into a lighting circuit to add a receptacle (the one you tapped into to install the fan)
 
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Old 07-04-04, 09:27 AM
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Originally Posted by tbird2340
When I wired up my fan in my living room I turned off the breaker for the receptacle I was tying into. This same breaker controlled:

Garage Door
Garage Lights
Kitchen Lights
Hall Light
Receptacle

And possible some other stuff. I was able to listen to the radio in the same room (receptacle wasn't tied into the others that were in the same room).
Do you mean that you didn't know beforehand what b reake controlled what outlets? Shame on you. Whenever you move into a house or apartment, you should very quickly determine what circuit breakers or fuses control what outlet and/or appliances. This information, in addition to be good to know, may save your life or someone else's life. It would be a tragedy to have someone die because you didn't take the time to map out the electricity in your house.
 
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Old 07-04-04, 04:40 PM
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Originally Posted by racraft
Do you mean that you didn't know beforehand what b reake controlled what outlets? Shame on you. Whenever you move into a house or apartment, you should very quickly determine what circuit breakers or fuses control what outlet and/or appliances. This information, in addition to be good to know, may save your life or someone else's life. It would be a tragedy to have someone die because you didn't take the time to map out the electricity in your house.
I'm sure there are many non-electrical minded ppl who don't map out their circuits. While your suggestions are very good, I don't see the reason for lambasting the poster and telling him that he should feel terribly depressed and despondant if and when someone died because of his failure to do something he had no idea of doing in the first place. Your suggestions are good, the tone with which you delivered them is questionable.
 
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Old 07-04-04, 05:05 PM
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My intention is not to make anyone feel depressed or despondent. My intention is to make them realize that they made a mistake, but more importantly to make others who read this realize that they are making a mistake if they haven;t done this.

I am a volunteer firefighter/medic. In my duties I have seen fires and electrocutions caused by bad wiring. Often these tragedies could have been prevented if either safe practices had been followed or if people understood just how dangerous electricity can be and knew the steps to take in an emergency.

Sometimes people need to realize the consequences of their actions (or inactions) to get them to take action.

The other side of the coin has to do with the non immediate tragedy side. I have seen people again and again post here, asking questions along the lines of , "How do I figure out which breaker controls my TV. The outlet no longer works and I want to make sure the power is off before I open it up."

Unfortunately, courses in basic home ownership are not required before people buy a house. If they were, and if people took them and then put the lessons into action, they wouldn't get themselves into the position where they don't know which breaker controls their TV.
 
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Old 07-04-04, 05:13 PM
doingitmyself
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Racraft

Agree with everything you said, Bob. People do need to know, and this forum is loaded with great information from knowledgable people like yourself. I've learned and am still learning from this place. I just sometimes see remarks that, while maybe they're not intended, can be taken as hateful. I apologize. I'm sure you didn't mean any of your comments that way. Keep up the good work here, and thank you for all the help you've been to me and others.

-Terry

PS) I have bad days sometimes and get to ranting too much
 
 

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