Shallow boxes or restud?


  #1  
Old 07-04-04, 05:03 AM
SiclunaJ
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Shallow boxes or restud?

Happy Birthday America!!

My basement has two outside walls that are unfinished. Actually, they are covered with rigid foam which sits between 2x4s placed flat and nail gunned to the poured concrete.

I want to run outlets along these walls, then sheetrock them. I heard about shallow boxes, in which case I'll only need to notch the existing studs to run the wire. A couple of folks have suggested that I should restud, place studs the proper way and toe nail them to the existing. That would allow use of regular boxes. Heck, I could even drill the holes for running the wire before nailing them in.

Anyway, any thoughts out there on which approach would be best? I plan to hire an electrician but can do the prep work.

Cheers!
 
  #2  
Old 07-04-04, 06:52 AM
V
Member
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Minneapolis, MN
Posts: 72
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Working with shallow boxes is a serious PITA. Also, GFI outlets won't fit in most of them, and making junctions in them rapidly brings them over their maximum fill amount. If it were me, I would definately furr out the wall to allow for full-sized boxes. Plus you'll be able to install twice as much insulation, which will make the basement more comfortable.
 
  #3  
Old 07-04-04, 01:11 PM
scott e.'s Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Anderson, IN
Posts: 385
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
If you are going to restud, do not remove the old, just nail another 2X4 on the flat on top of the existing studs. They will be a little wider than normal, but will save you alot of time in ripping out the old.
 
  #4  
Old 07-04-04, 02:49 PM
J
Member
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: United States
Posts: 17,733
Upvotes: 0
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
Building a new stud wall is by far the best solution. It allows for flexible installation of electrical and insulation, and is your only hope for providing a wall that is straight and plumb. And I promise you that you will never miss those two inches.

However, if you go ahead and use what you have anyway, then use only 15-amp circuits so that you can stick with #14 wire, and plan your layout carefully so that you will have at most two cables into any one box. Put nailer plates over every place where the cable goes through a stud (I suppose "stud" is the wrong word--it's probably a fat furring strip).
 
  #5  
Old 07-05-04, 03:46 AM
SiclunaJ
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
More lumber to order...

Thanks for the input. More studs over the existing will be my approach. Now for the rest of the story.....I've got a small basement window, one double sash, and one set of sliders that are already trimmed out. The trim will have to be removed I guess and retrimmed to the greater depth of the "new" wall. Oh, and if I place the new studs flat over the existing, will I have the right depth for regular boxes? Studs are 1.5", two would be 3", right?

Love this website!
 
  #6  
Old 07-05-04, 09:44 AM
J
Member
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: United States
Posts: 17,733
Upvotes: 0
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
Yes, 3 inches (plus the extra half inch of the drywall) is enough for a good-sized box.

However, I'd still build an independent stud wall with the 2x4s the other way. It won't take any more wood, and it will give you a plumb and straight wall. You may not notice that the wall isn't straight now, but you will when the drywall is up.
 
  #7  
Old 07-05-04, 03:02 PM
scott e.'s Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Anderson, IN
Posts: 385
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Good point, John. I hadn't thought about wavy drywall, just ease of installation. I guess if the original studs/basement wall is straight, then doubling up on the studs should lead to a straight wall also. I guess you could also build a traditional stud wall in front of the existing studs and go from there.
 
  #8  
Old 07-05-04, 03:25 PM
J
Member
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: United States
Posts: 17,733
Upvotes: 0
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
There's no such thing as a straight and plumb foundation wall.
 
  #9  
Old 07-06-04, 03:48 AM
SiclunaJ
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
To tell the truth, there are very few straight runs of sheetrock in my house. I can build the first straight wall! OK, so the wall will be conventional construction. One good thing here is that there is absolutely no moisture problem, always bone dry.

Thanks for the help.
 
  #10  
Old 07-06-04, 04:40 AM
V
Member
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Minneapolis, MN
Posts: 72
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by SiclunaJ
To tell the truth, there are very few straight runs of sheetrock in my house. I can build the first straight wall! OK, so the wall will be conventional construction. One good thing here is that there is absolutely no moisture problem, always bone dry.

Thanks for the help.
Dry or not, there are codes about vapor and/or moisture barriers that you will probably have to put up (closing up a dry wall improperly is a great way to get a wet one). There also may be additional limitations on how wire is run in a wall next to the foundation, which vary from locality to locality. Best to check those things out with your local authority before starting.
 
  #11  
Old 07-06-04, 06:30 AM
SiclunaJ
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Roger that!
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: