Flex conduit & Code

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  #1  
Old 07-13-04, 07:45 PM
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Question Flex conduit & Code

Where I work, I'm doing preliminary wiring for machines being brought in, 3-phase 480 V motors. I'm running the wiring, then testing for rotation & swapping wires as needed. This will all be checked by a "real" electrician before production (to my relief). I'm using "sealtite" flexible between machines, as the electrical boxes are mounted on the back & the machines must be pulled away from the wall to be wired, then pushed back in place, making the use of all rigid impractical. To avoid creating extra work for myself, I have a question regarding limits of use of this flexible stuff. I understand code may restrict use to "so many feet " per machine, but the electrician is not available to check this with. There's 14 machines in a row, with 6 ft. between the connections as presently spaced. If there's a problem doing it this way, then I'll have to run rigid conduit on the wall, then connect through junction boxes to each machine. I prefer to do t right the first time. Any comments??
Thank you
Jess
 
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Old 07-14-04, 07:46 PM
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What is type of conduit is used going to the outlet boxes?I reccomend using rigid against the wall stopping short at each peice of equipment.Then going to each machine with the sealtite.I haven't looked it up yet but I think the max. length of sealtite that can be run is 3'.Make certain you size the conduit/sealtite properly for the condutors you use to feed each machine.Good luck
 
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Old 07-15-04, 09:27 AM
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Art 356.10-------- "LFNC-B shall be permitted to be installed in lenths longer than 6 ft. when secured in accordance with Art. 36.30."

356.30 requires clamps/straps within 12" of the ends, and every 3 ft. along the linear run.

You certainly could comply with these requirements if you use metallic-lined "Sealtite for maximum mechanical strenth.

Good Luck and Enjoy the Experience!!!!!!!!!!!!
 
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Old 07-15-04, 09:05 PM
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Thank you for the clarification. I'll have to add a few extra clamps to make this code compliant, but this is good news as my boss is eager to get the machines running ASAP. I have several wired up now, most of the lengths of sealtite are just under 6 ft. I insisted on running a grounding wire as well, for my own piece of mind, even if it isn't really necessary. This 3-phase stuff is all new to me, so I'm learning as I go. Other than correspondance course offerings, I haven't found much reading material to refer to...(Industrial wiring for dummies??). Do you have any recomendations for reading that may assist me in the future? I'll be maintaining the machinery once it's in production as well, and prefer to not learn troubleshooting techniques the hard way. A copy of the code would probably be good to have on hand, but the company is rather..."frugal".
Jess
 
  #5  
Old 07-16-04, 10:28 AM
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As to the "necessity" of a Green EGC, Art.350.60 reads----- "Where used to connect equiptment where flexibility is required, an EGC shall be installed."

I hope you used wire-colors that identify a 440-volt circuit.

For "trouble-shooting", I advise you to aquire, from an electrical supply house, a quality voltage-tester suitable for 440-volt circuits.A rugged and reliable Ideal voltage tester would be ideal.

Good Luck & Enjoy the Experience!!!!!!!!!
 
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Old 07-17-04, 08:27 AM
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PATTBAA.... A little research turned this up.... are you trying to tell me something??
The following is from "IDEAL's" website:

WASHINGTON, July 31, 2003 -- Ideal Solenoid Voltage Testers manufactured by Ideal Industries Inc. are being recalled. They can short out at high voltages. Consumers can suffer burns.

Ideal has received 11 reports of these testers shorting out at higher voltages, resulting in the faceplate blowing off the units. Two users were burned when their units reportedly shorted out. One reportedly sustained third-degree burns on his hands, forearms, neck and face, while the other suffered second- and third-degree burns to his hands.

These are Ideal voltage and voltage/continuity testers with model numbers 61-065, 61-066, 61-067, 61-076, 61-079, and 61-080. "IDEAL" and the model number are located on the front of the tester. The tester body is yellow. The wire leads have one black and one red test probe. Recalled units were manufactured between November 1999 and May 2002. Contact Ideal to determine if your electrical tester is included in this recall.

The units were sold at electrical distributors, industrial distributors and home centers nationwide between December 1999 and July 2003 for between $30 and $65.

Contact Ideal to receive a free replacement tester.
 

Last edited by HD_RIDER; 07-17-04 at 08:28 AM. Reason: Mispelling
  #7  
Old 07-19-04, 06:58 AM
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Any of the Ideal testers that were still on the shelves of the supplyhouses,home centers etc. were immediately returned if they had the right mfg.code #.Anyone who purchased one should check Ideals site for the mfg.code # that were recalled
 
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Old 07-19-04, 08:58 AM
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What you refer to is obviously a flawed design. The flaw is including the "continuity" feature in addition to the basic voltage-testing design.----Keep It Simple-----

This complicated "gimmick" may have mis-lead those who have used it to believe they could perform continuity-tests on "Live" circuits--- or perhaps it was an attempt at a design for "live" continuity testing--- Very Flawed Concept in my opinion.
 
  #9  
Old 07-19-04, 05:57 PM
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Smile

Understood... I've never had the urge to test continuity on a live circuit, although I suppose there could be situations where it might be advantagous to be able to. Presently my testing is confined to what I can determine with a 4 bulb neon tester (sequential lights as the voltage increases), and a small digital multi-meter that I've only used for low voltage (so far) and for continuity/ resistance tests. I'll add an "Ideal voltage tester" to my toolbox as soon as I can afford it! (Next payday, perhaps.)

Thanks to all of you in this forum who are willing to answer even the most basic questions. I don't pretend to be a professional, but I'm not totally without some knowlege of the field, either. It's nice to have this valuable pool of knowlege available with just a little effort at the keyboard.
 
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