Sub-Panel Issue

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  #1  
Old 07-21-04, 05:39 PM
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Exclamation Sub-Panel Issue

Not trying to be long, just give as much info as I can. I have a 200 amp entrance. Have installed 100 amp sub-panel 85' away. Used 2,2,2,4 wire. Sub-panel is Square-D QO style. When I turned the breaker on everything is fine. I hooked up 2-15 amp & 2-20 amp single pole breakers, still everythings is fine. Now is where I am having issues. I am installing a 40 Double Pole Breaker, using 8,3w/g, this is for a Cook Stove. I installed the outlet for the stove, first try I used a 3 prong cord, from left to right I used Red, White, Black. When I turned it on without plugging the stove in it was fine. When I plugged the stove in then turned the breaker on it kicked the main breaker in the sub-panel. I tried re-wiring the plug, I reversed the black & red wires. When the breaker was turned on this time, it popped and a small fire ball came out of the box, but NO breakers tripped anywhere.
I have the ground wire in both panels hooked up to the neutral bar. Could this be the problem?
 
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  #2  
Old 07-21-04, 06:39 PM
CSelectric
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First things first, the ground and neutral should only tie together at the main panel. You need to keep them on seperate busses in the subpanel. However, this would have no effect on the problem you describe.

It sounds a lot like you are connecting a hot circuit lead to ground at the recept. Unfortunately, it's impossible to positively diagnose that sight unseen. Look at the back of the recept. there should be some indication as to which terminal is ground, hot, neutral, etc. The ground should be terminated under a green screw, that is the most obvious give away. Likewise, a neutral, if present should terminate under a silver screw and the hot under a brass, or black screw. Also, most recepts (excepting the garden variety 120V type) have a text legend printed on or molded into the plastic next to the screws. Often, this is something as simple as X,Y,G. In that case, G is the ground.
 
  #3  
Old 07-21-04, 06:49 PM
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This is an Electric Stove outlet. All the screws are the same color, that is the problem. I assumed that the white wire (Neutral) would go in the middle. I hadn't hooked up the ground wire yet. Would that be the problem? I am helping put together an in-law apartment. The stove I am hooking up originally came out of the house. I went to the original location of the Cook Stove and the wires seem to be connected in the same order as I have them now. But it is not working quite as nice. When the breaker was turned on and the popping sound, I was surprised the no breakers tripped. I didn't try to turn the stove on in fear that I would do more damage than good.
 
  #4  
Old 07-21-04, 07:00 PM
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The Panel I used is a Main Panel Box. It has the 100 amp Main breaker at the top of the box. How would you seperate the neutral bar from the ground bar. Are the two not connected together?
 
  #5  
Old 07-21-04, 07:43 PM
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Buy an add-on grounding bar if it didn't come with one. Don't install the green screw or bonding strap (this will keep the existing neutral bar isolated from the panel). You have it wrong now, and it is a serious safety hazard, but none of this has anything to do with your problem tripping the breaker.

If you tripped a 100-amp breaker, then you've got a very serious wiring problem here. Don't keep experimenting. Don't turn the power back on until you're 100% sure you know what went wrong before and 100% sure that you have now corrected it!!!

I assumed that the white wire (Neutral) would go in the middle
This is life or death here. It's no place to start assuming stuff!

I didn't try to turn the stove on in fear that I would do more damage than good.
Best decision yet.

On the other hand, this is an in-law apartment. Maybe you don't like your in-laws very much anyway.

I think someone with experience would probably spot the problem in about three seconds if he could see it. It's tough, however, without seeing it.
 
  #6  
Old 07-23-04, 05:35 AM
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You mentioned that the main breaker in the sub panel tripped. Are you feeding the sub through a breaker in the main panel, or is it tied directly to the service conductors? You should be feeding the sub through a breaker in the main. Not doing so will not cause the problems you describe, but could you imagine what would happen if the sub feed wires where damaged.
 
  #7  
Old 07-23-04, 05:44 AM
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In the main panel there in a 100 amp breaker feeding the subpanel.
 
  #8  
Old 07-23-04, 05:51 AM
mgb
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Sounds like there is something wrong with the stove. Could have happened when you moved it?
 
  #9  
Old 08-28-04, 05:33 AM
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I had someone look at the wiring. An Ohm Meter found a short circuit. He found that when I hooked up the outlet when the wire went through the clamp I pinched a wire.
 
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