grounding wire question

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Old 07-29-04, 09:34 AM
Janice128
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grounding wire question

is it acceptable to have the grounding wire attached to the screw in the back of a metal box or should it be dettached and attached to the outlet. I'm replacing this oulet and currently the ground is attached in the back, I'll move it if it's better attached to the outlet itself.
 
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Old 07-29-04, 09:37 AM
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Metal boxes for outlets need to be grounded. You can pigtail the ground from the wire comming into the box to ground to the box and the outlet.
 
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Old 07-29-04, 09:47 AM
Janice128
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I'm not sure there is enough wire to do this, but I'll try. What do I do if there isn't enough wire?

BTW, thanks for your response and help with my problem today, after intalling this outlet (I decided to try replacing the oldest outlet on the circuit), there is now power running to all the outlets. I now need to attach this ground and put all the outlets back in place. Oh, and it is a 15 amp plug, I just checked after reading your other message.

Janice
 
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Old 07-29-04, 10:06 AM
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At the home center, you can buy a package of grounding pigtails. These are green screws with a green wire already attached to them. Attach the green screw to the box. Then use a wire nut to attach this green wire to the grounding wire coming into the box, and to another short wire that runs to the green grounding screw on the receptacle.

Or, if you buy a "self-grounding" receptacle, then you can skip all this stuff, since such a receptacle makes a positive connection between the receptacle and the box.
 
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Old 07-29-04, 10:10 AM
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...or you can just strip out the ground wire out of a couple of lengths of romex (6" long each), tie them to the existing ground wire you have and like magic you have two ground wires long enough to reach the box and the outlet. That's essentially a "pigtail", but like the previous guy said you can buy them pre-made at the local Home Depot.
 
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Old 07-29-04, 10:21 AM
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...here's a good example. This image is off of this site:

http://doityourself.com/images/elvd-19.jpg

You see the bare copper wires coming out of the bottom of the box? That's a home made pigtail ground using a red wire nut. One copper wire comes from the shielded wire coming into the back of the box (either from the panel or from another outlet), then a length of bare copper wire is tied to that using the wire nut to screw to the back of the box, and finally there's another bare copper wire with a hook bent in the end also attached with that same wire nut to go to the outlet.
 
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Old 07-29-04, 11:18 AM
Janice128
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Ok, I'm off to the store to get what I need to finish the grounding properly. Thanks for all your help, it looks like the problem has been fixed with a minimum of expenditure

Janice
 
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Old 07-29-04, 11:56 AM
rlrct
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Originally Posted by John Nelson
At the home center, you can buy a package of grounding pigtails. These are green screws with a green wire already attached to them. Attach the green screw to the box. Then use a wire nut to attach this green wire to the grounding wire coming into the box, and to another short wire that runs to the green grounding screw on the receptacle.

Or, if you buy a "self-grounding" receptacle, then you can skip all this stuff, since such a receptacle makes a positive connection between the receptacle and the box.
Self-grounding receptacles are great when you can guarantee good contact between the box and receptacle yoke. Some of the work I've done at the family cottage (everything was BX and metal boxes) where the boxes are recessed a little beneath the drywall means you can't be sure of good contact between the box and yoke (and opening up the wall right now wasn't an option).

The idea of the grounding wires is great, because the wire guarantees you've got a solidly-connected grounding conductor.
 
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