manufactured home electrical outlets

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  #1  
Old 08-04-04, 10:12 AM
clmdpk2
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manufactured home electrical outlets

I am replacing all the electrical outlets in my 1994 manufactured home and have come across a wiring situation I don't understand. The old outlet has three black wires and three white wires, all inserted into the quick attach holes in the old outlet. I've never seen three of each. I've seen two when it's a dead end outlet, and four if it continues elsewhere, but three is a new one. These outlets continue so the new outlets have four screws. Any thoughs on how to attach this configuration to the new outlets?
 
  #2  
Old 08-04-04, 10:59 AM
R
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You need tol use wire nuts and pigtails.
 
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Old 08-04-04, 03:25 PM
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Three pairs mean you have two branch circuits off of one outlet (one pair supplying power to the outlet - two going to other branches; an outlet, a switch/light, whatever). They're probably serving two other outlets on their own branches.

One pair is a dead end. Two pair means the outlet is serving one other branch circuit. Four pair means it's serving three other branch circuits.

racraft is right. Make some pigtails if you only have screws. Tie the blacks together with a wire nut (you'll need at least a big red one - it depends on the guage of your wire but that'll work for 12/2), plus a small black length of wire about 6" long. The end of that scrap piece of wire will then connect to the brass side of the outlet. Do the same for the white, only the scrap of white will connect to the silver side of the outlet. The other two screws you don't need since the tabs on the side of the outlet provide uninterrupted power between the top and the bottom.

Wierd. ALL of the outlets I buy have holes in the back for quick connections. At least there are holes, where you can use the screws to tighten down wires you've stripped and placed in there...

Make sure you're using outlets made of good quality. I stay away from the bargain 15 amp bin of outlets. I use the heavier duty ones, and if I can get 20 amp outlets I use those.
 
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Old 08-08-04, 10:03 AM
clmdpk2
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Originally Posted by racraft
You need tol use wire nuts and pigtails.

Thanks for the advice.
 
  #5  
Old 08-08-04, 10:04 AM
clmdpk2
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Originally Posted by COBALT
Three pairs mean you have two branch circuits off of one outlet (one pair supplying power to the outlet - two going to other branches; an outlet, a switch/light, whatever). They're probably serving two other outlets on their own branches.

One pair is a dead end. Two pair means the outlet is serving one other branch circuit. Four pair means it's serving three other branch circuits.

racraft is right. Make some pigtails if you only have screws. Tie the blacks together with a wire nut (you'll need at least a big red one - it depends on the guage of your wire but that'll work for 12/2), plus a small black length of wire about 6" long. The end of that scrap piece of wire will then connect to the brass side of the outlet. Do the same for the white, only the scrap of white will connect to the silver side of the outlet. The other two screws you don't need since the tabs on the side of the outlet provide uninterrupted power between the top and the bottom.

Wierd. ALL of the outlets I buy have holes in the back for quick connections. At least there are holes, where you can use the screws to tighten down wires you've stripped and placed in there...

Make sure you're using outlets made of good quality. I stay away from the bargain 15 amp bin of outlets. I use the heavier duty ones, and if I can get 20 amp outlets I use those.


Thanks a lot for the information. I'll give it a try!
 
 

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