Two electric showers on one circuit - help


  #1  
Old 08-11-04, 07:14 AM
RJenkins
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Two electric showers on one circuit - help

I have just bought my first house (yay!) but I have a few questions about the electrics (boo!).

Basically, there is an existing electric shower (8.5kw) in an en-suite bathroom which has its own dedicated circuit wired from the consumer unit with the proper double poll switch in place. I assume the circuit breaker at the consumer unit is set to 30 amps but that is easily upgradeable to 45amps if I need to. I want to know if I can connect a 2nd electric shower (10.5kw) to the existing circuit instead of wiring another dedicated radial circuit. Can someone help me please?

Thanks in advance,

Ross.
 
  #2  
Old 08-11-04, 07:32 AM
R
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What is an electric shower?

What are the requirements of this electric shower, as stated on the device itself?

I am thinking that you cannot add another unit on the same circuit, based on the limitations of a 30 amp 220 circuit, but I could be wrong.

Also, what do you mean by "consumer unit" when referring to where the circuit is wired from? What do you mean by radial circuit?
 
  #3  
Old 08-11-04, 07:40 AM
RJenkins
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When I say an electric shower I mean a shower unit (for the bathroom) which has only a cold water pipe running into it and the water is heated inside the unit before coming out so that you can have a warm shower without having to have stored hot water.

When I say 'consumer unit' I mean the unit that the main electric cable runs into from the outside and from where power is distrubted to sockets, cooker, lights etc, I am in the UK so maybe you are unfamiliar with the setup.

When I say radial circuit I mean a circuit that is not terminated by running back into the consumer unit like you would terminate a ring main for sockets. A radial circuit terminates at the last socket or light fitting and does not have a wire returning to the consumer unit.

I hope that helps.

Ross.
 
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Old 08-11-04, 07:48 AM
R
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Okay, you are referring to an instantaneous water heater.

Are you from the UK or Europe?

In North America circuits do not run back to the circuit breaker panel. All circuits terminate in one or more locations.

We still need to know what the face place of the electric shower indicates for wiring requirements. It should tell you what minimum size wire is required and what size breaker is required.
 
  #5  
Old 08-11-04, 01:14 PM
J
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8.5 Kw @240 volts = 35 amps
10.5 Kw @240 volts = 43 amps
If your existing circuit can handle 80 amps then you could combine them. I doubt it can handle that. I think a new circuit is order.
 
 

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