Gfci

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  #1  
Old 08-18-04, 10:18 AM
markP
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Gfci

Need to install a GFCI to the kitchen but found a 4 wiring system rather than the normal 3. Will I still be able to install the GFCI. What do I do with the extra red wire.
Appreciate the help.
 
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  #2  
Old 08-18-04, 10:45 AM
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It sounds like you have a multiwire system. Using a GFCI recepticle outlet on a multiwire system means that you need a GFCI recepticle for each location, rather than using one to protect each circuit.

Is this the last recepticle on the circuit, or one earlier on the circuit?
 
  #3  
Old 08-18-04, 10:56 AM
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If this is a split receptacle, with both red and black on it, then you cap the red or the black and use only the white and one of them. You now only have one circuit instead of 2 on that receptacle.
 
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Old 08-18-04, 11:04 AM
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Middle of the run

Thanks for the quick responses. This receptacle is in the middle of the run so I won't be able to cap off either red or black because it may cut off power to the adjacent receptacles.
Thanks again
 
  #5  
Old 08-18-04, 11:16 AM
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Choose either the red or the black wires, and connect both of them to the line side hot terminal.

Take the other color wire (black or red) and connect them together with a wire nut.

Connect the white wires to the line side neutral connection.

Connect the ground wires together and to the GFCI recepticle as well as to the metal box.

You now have a GFCI recepticle, but no feed through protection.
 
  #6  
Old 08-18-04, 11:24 AM
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Depending on how many outlets you need to protect, it may be cheaper and easier to get a double-pole GFCI breaker. The breakeven point is probably somewhere between four and eight.
 
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Old 08-18-04, 08:00 PM
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A question

Makes sense to me. Although I have one more question.
Would I be able to cap off the red at the beginning of the run, replace this receptacle with a GFCI (in the manner you'd suggested), & then replace all other receptacles down the line with standard receptacles. That would mean I would wire the receptacles down the line from the GFCI as you would a standard receptacle, with black, white & red.
I really appreciate the help.
 
  #8  
Old 08-18-04, 08:11 PM
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as you would a standard receptacle, with black, white & red
I'm going to guess that that was a typo, and you meant black, white and bare.

Abandoning the red wire would certainly simplify GFCI, and would allow you to use only one GFCI, but you've be giving up half of the available power and violating the code requiring two small appliance circuits in the kitchen. Even though this code probably wasn't in effect when your kitchen was originally wired, I don't think you can go backwards.
 
  #9  
Old 08-19-04, 05:31 AM
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Oops, I did mean Black, White & Bare.

Ok, I guess using one GFCI won't work then.
I have 4 receptacles to replace so I will install a GFCI at each one.
I'll use the method as advised in #5 above. How do I still keep the 2 appliance circuit running. Do I join the red wires together at the first receptacle, bypassing the GFCI & then at the second receptacle, join the black wires together bypassing the GFCI. Then alternate again for the third & fourth receptacles.
We're getting there - thanks for all the help.
 
  #10  
Old 08-19-04, 06:18 AM
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Yes, use the black wires connected to recepticle for one circuit, and use the red wires for the other circuit.

Often this is every other outlet, but you may want to look at how you actually use the outlets to decide what works best. For example, you probably want to put the recepticles for the microwave and coffee maker on different circuits.

Just make sure that you have at least one recepticle connected to the black wires and at least one connected to the red wires.
 
  #11  
Old 08-19-04, 08:13 AM
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Thanks !

Many Thanks Guys !
 
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