tracking down a 220 run

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  #1  
Old 08-25-04, 07:34 PM
isukennedy
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tracking down a 220 run

I've posted on this subject before, but have performed new tests to report on / ask about.

I have a 220 outlet in my bedroom which, by the previous owner, was used to power a window AC unit that does not work.

The setup:
There is 1 2-wire coming into the box and one going out. There is a wirenut which connects those two grounds, a ground wire to the box and a ground coming out of the box to the outlet. This circuit goes to a 30 amp double breaker. I can trace the circuit through the joists until it disappears though a brick wall into the garage joists (covered with a drywall ceiling - who does that?) and into my bedroom (above the garage).

My tests to date:
- I've removed the plug and checked voltage across all the wires. Nothing.
- Trying to check continuity, I ran a 2-wire and a 3-wire (to cover all 5 leads coming out of the box) from the outlet box downstairs to the breaker box and the place where the wires disappear through the brick (they're close together).
- I checked all of these (extended) leads against all the breakers and all the grounds. Nothing.
- Since the breaker box test didn't work, I stripped both the disappearing wires and checked each lead. again, nothing.

I have not:
- checked continuity between the breaker box and the spot I stripped, but will assume it works 'cause i got a mild shock when i accidentally touched the hot and ground lead (yes, the breaker was off, but not the main).
- torn down any drywall in my bedroom, the garage or torn up the floor in my bedroom to find out if the wires have been severed or shorted.

Does anyone have any ideas?

I've considered trying to pull new wire through, but fear my effort will be smited by staples, joist holes, etc - i think there are just too many turns for the wire.

Other than that, is there an easy way to turn this 220 AC unit into a 110 unit? I have plenty of 110 plugs that work.

peace-
Matt Kennedy
 
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  #2  
Old 08-25-04, 07:50 PM
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I have a 220 outlet in my bedroom which, by the previous owner, was used to power a window AC unit that does not work.
The air conditioner does not work, or the receptacle does not work?

There is 1 2-wire coming into the box and one going out.
Very unusual for a 240-volt circuit to have more than one outlet.

This circuit goes to a 30 amp double breaker.
Very unusual to have a 30-amp air conditioner, and quite illegal to put a 15-amp or 20-amp receptacle on a 30-amp circuit.

garage joists covered with a drywall ceiling - who does that?) and into my bedroom (above the garage).
Everybody who wants to be code compliant does that. Not only is this a fire-rated ceiling (and thus covered with 5/8" type X drywall), but this space will be insulated, and needs to be well sealed to keep automobile exhaust gases out of your bedroom. Don't breach this barrier, or repair it well if you do.

i got a mild shock when i accidentally touched the hot and ground lead (yes, the breaker was off, but not the main).
I think you're incorrect about which breaker controls power to this wire, which is good because as stated earlier, it shouldn't be a 30-amp breaker anyway.

I've considered trying to pull new wire through, but fear my effort will be smited by staples, joist holes, etc - i think there are just too many turns for the wire.
You are correct. Using the old wire to pull new wire would be quite impossible.

Are you sure that this is a 240-volt receptacle? Exactly what does the configuration of slots and holes look like?
 
  #3  
Old 08-27-04, 01:45 PM
isukennedy
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Originally Posted by John Nelson
The air conditioner does not work, or the receptacle does not work?
The air conditioner works. There's no voltage across any of the wires.

Originally Posted by John Nelson
Very unusual for a 240-volt circuit to have more than one outlet.
its only one outlet. one wire coming in the bottom and one going out the top

Originally Posted by John Nelson
Very unusual to have a 30-amp air conditioner, and quite illegal to put a 15-amp or 20-amp receptacle on a 30-amp circuit.
i could be wrong about the amperage on the ac unit.

Originally Posted by John Nelson
Everybody who wants to be code compliant does that. Not only is this a fire-rated ceiling (and thus covered with 5/8" type X drywall), but this space will be insulated, and needs to be well sealed to keep automobile exhaust gases out of your bedroom. Don't breach this barrier, or repair it well if you do.
fair enough.

Originally Posted by John Nelson
I think you're incorrect about which breaker controls power to this wire, which is good because as stated earlier, it shouldn't be a 30-amp breaker anyway.
i'm assuming this is the breaker as it controls nothing else in the entire house. i've checked it all.

Originally Posted by John Nelson
You are correct. Using the old wire to pull new wire would be quite impossible.
any other ideas?

Originally Posted by John Nelson
Are you sure that this is a 240-volt receptacle? Exactly what does the configuration of slots and holes look like?
a pair of horizontal blades with a ground plug (even though its not ground since its 220/30/40/whatever.
 
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Old 08-27-04, 01:57 PM
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its only one outlet. one wire coming in the bottom and one going out the top
"Wire" or "cable". I thought I understood from your first post that there were two pairs of wires in this box. I can understand one pair coming from the panel, but where does the second pair go?

a pair of horizontal blades with a ground plug
Sounds like a NEMA 6-15, a 15-amp 240-volt receptacle. Any chance you have a 15-amp double-pole breaker in that panel?
 
  #5  
Old 08-28-04, 08:29 AM
isukennedy
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Originally Posted by John Nelson
"Wire" or "cable". I thought I understood from your first post that there were two pairs of wires in this box. I can understand one pair coming from the panel, but where does the second pair go?
i wish i knew where the second went. it might help solve my problems.

Originally Posted by John Nelson
Sounds like a NEMA 6-15, a 15-amp 240-volt receptacle. Any chance you have a 15-amp double-pole breaker in that panel?
not that lucky. there are two kinds of outlets with that config - one is small-ish, about the size of a normal 110 plug and one that's much larger. i have the much larger one.
 
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