How do we wire this?

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  #1  
Old 08-29-04, 04:44 PM
jkprn
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How do we wire this?

Trying to bring hot wire into new shed. Will run into a receptacle outlet first. The light switch is on one end of the shed with the light fixture on the other (the receptacle is in the middle). How do we wire this? No luck as of yet!
 
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  #2  
Old 08-29-04, 05:41 PM
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I don't think I understand the question.
Go from the receptacle to the switch, from the switch to the light.
Is that what you mean?
 
  #3  
Old 08-30-04, 04:34 AM
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If you are trying to accomplish this with only a single cable, then you will have to use a section of 3 conductor cable (with ground) somewhere. The exact details depend on what order the outlets are in .

If you have power-switch-recepticle-light, then you need 3 conductor cable between the switch and recepticle.
 
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Old 08-30-04, 03:52 PM
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You say hot wire, hope you mean cable with two or maybe three conductors (wires) and ground wire. Tell us the sequence you want to wire this circuit...you mention receptacle is first....so do you want it wired receptacle--switch--light?.....Roger
 
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Old 08-30-04, 06:53 PM
hex2k1
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From what i understand you are trying to feed a recepticle, switch, and light in a new shed. I am assuming that the shed has no existing power at any of the devices you wrote about. If that is the case youre going to need more than just the hot wire. you will need to bring a hot, neutral & ground to what ever device your tying into first. Next you will have to tap your conductors and take a hot and switch leg (wire) to your switch. keep in mind your switch leg is going to terminate at your switch and light only it will not land at your recepticle like all the other wires. along with your switch leg you are going to take your neutral, and grounding conductor from the recepticle which you have your tapped conductors to the light fixture. so to recap you will have hot,neutral,ground at recepticle.. hot from recepticle to switch.. a switch leg from switch to light fixture along with neutral and ground from recepticle to light fixture. If your shed is metal you will have to ground it according to the nec or local codes your owners manual might have some reference to that. hope this helps out and is not to confusing
 
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Old 08-30-04, 07:14 PM
rlrct
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jkrpn,

From your receptacle, run a single 14/2+ground to the light fixture.
From your receptacle, run a single 14/2+ground to the light switch. Take black electricians tape and tag/mark the white conductor on each end, i.e. at the receptacle and at the switch.

If the circuit to your shed is a 20 amp circuit, use 12/2+ground.

At the receptacle, pigtail all the grounds (bare/green) together.
At the receptacle, pigtail the neutral/white from your feeding cable to the neutral/white from the receptacle and the neutral/white going to the light fixture.
At the receptacle, pigtail the hot/black from your feeding cable to the hot/black from the receptacle and the hot/black that goes to the switch.
At the receptacle, connect the switched hot/white with black tape from the light switch to the black that goes to your light fixture.
At the light switch, connect the black and white with black tape to the switch. Doesn't matter which is top or bottom.
At the light fixture, connect the neutral/white to the silver terminal/screw.
At the light fixture, connect the hot/black to the brass terminal/screw.
At each box, connect the grounding conductor to the switch/receptacle/box as appropriate.

If you need to, draw this out and ask questions.
 
  #7  
Old 08-30-04, 08:27 PM
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There are a million ways to do this. rlrct provided one (although not quite a code-compliant one, and not the simplest one in my opinion).

At the receptacle, pigtail the hot/black from your feeding cable to the hot/black from the receptacle and the hot/black that goes to the switch. At the receptacle, connect the switched hot/white with black tape from the light switch to the black that goes to your light fixture.
Modify the quote above with the quote below if you wish to make rlrct's instructions code-compliant.
At the receptacle, pigtail the hot/black from your feeding cable to the hot/black from the receptacle and the hot/white with black tape that goes to the switch. At the receptacle, connect the switched hot/black from the light switch to the black that goes to your light fixture.
 
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Old 08-31-04, 04:18 AM
rlrct
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John,

What code section did my post violate? Ref 200-7(c)(1)+(2). ...(1) allows for reidentifying a white conductor and doesn't specifically exclude switched legs, (2) is written fairly specifically to cover switched legs. My understanding of the NEC is that either method would meet the code, mostly because if the code doesn't exclude it - you can do it. I personally prefer to use 14-3 or 12-3 in such a case and use the red leg as switched, but didn't want to go there because it introduced another cable (leaves the grounded conductor free for pulling a future circuit out of the switch box if need be). I've seen both methods used in the wiring done in our house. If the convention on this site is tag the switched leg, that's what I'll post in the future.

What would be a simpler way to wire this, given power feed in the middle of the circuit?
 
  #9  
Old 08-31-04, 05:17 AM
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I don't have my code book in front of me, and I am not sure if it is a recent change, and am working from memory. In current code (NEC 2002) the section that describes re-coding the wires in a cable for a switch loop specifically required that the re-coded wire be used for the un-switched leg of a switch loop. IMHO this makes sense, but only in a _very_ minor way: If you run your switched loop with the re-coded white being the feed to the switch and the black being the switched hot coming from the switch, then the wires coming out of the junction box to feed your fixture are properly coded white neutral and black hot. Also, a white wire that doesn't test as 'hot' might be mistaken for a neutral, but it could be a switched hot conductor.

My personal feeling on this is that it is so minor as to be on the level of 'ground up or down' *grin* But now it is in the code.

-Jon
 
  #10  
Old 08-31-04, 06:44 AM
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Jon is correct. It is more than a convention--it is specifically required by code. The NEC requires that the remarked white wire be used to supply power to the switch, and that the black wire return switched power. The idea is that you end up with a black and white wire at the other end of the switch loop (rather than two white wires), minimizing the chance you will reverse the polarity when connecting it. It makes a lot of sense to me.

Also, I think most people prefer a black marker to remark the wires rather than black tape. The tape falls off too easily and is not considered "permanent" by many inspectors.
 
  #11  
Old 08-31-04, 12:27 PM
rlrct
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... not the simplest one in my opinion ...
John,

How would you have wired this?

Rob
 
  #12  
Old 08-31-04, 02:10 PM
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Switch loops cause endless confusion for the DIYer. Whenever practical, I suggest DIYers avoid them (I also avoid them myself whenever practical). With open walls, it's almost always practical and usually just costs a few more feet of wire. People get stuck in a rut thinking that they need to wire a circuit in the manner that uses the least amount of wire. That's not really a great goal.

So to wire one unswitched receptacle, one switch, and one switched light, I suggest either one of:
  1. Power-R-S-L.
  2. Power-S-L and S-R.
I prefer the first since it's hard to screw it up.

One advantage of having both a hot and a neutral in every box is that it is not only less confusing, but usually makes future modifications easier.
 
  #13  
Old 09-04-04, 06:51 PM
tnelectinsp
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Exclamation Code violation

If you wire it according to option 1 you will have violated 225.31 and 32. You must have a disconnecting means at each separate building or structure that disconnects all ungrounded conductors as soon as the conductors enter the building.
 
  #14  
Old 09-04-04, 07:20 PM
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Thanks for pointing that out, TN. So I'd wire it Power-S1-R-S2-L, where S1 serves as your disconnect and S2 controls the light.
 
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