What wires?

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  #1  
Old 09-09-04, 05:09 PM
rj1kender
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Question What wires?

I am being told about different wire sizes. I am told that there is 12 gauge and 14 gauge that is used in household wiring. I had installed 4 gfic plugs in my new kitchen. I used 14-2 with ground and ran it to the meter box on it's own circuit. I used 14-2 with ground for the fridge and ran it to the meter box on it's own circuit. I also used 14-2 with ground on the garbage disposal and ran it to the meter box on a seperate circuit. This was all new wiring from the plugs to the meter. I re-wired the kitchen and dinning room lights. the old power line was 12-2 no ground. I hooked into this line with 14-2 with a ground, to supply power to the new lights and I ran a seperate ground from the lights to the switch and then to the meter. Did I use the correct size wire or will the 12 gauge burn out the 14 gauge?
 
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Old 09-09-04, 05:28 PM
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Although it is true that both 12 and 14 gauge wires are used, that does not mean that you can just use either one without concern for the application.

If you connected any of that 14-gauge wire to a circuit protected by a 20-amp breaker, you should remove it all, and redo it with 12-gauge. And if this is connected to a 15-amp breaker, then you violated a whole different set of codes. If you made either mistake, it's a heads up that you should read a few more books before doing any more wiring.
 

Last edited by John Nelson; 09-09-04 at 06:46 PM.
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Old 09-10-04, 06:55 PM
rj1kender
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John, so in other words all the work that I did is wrong because another electrician said it was okay to use 14-2. You are saying that I should replace all the 14-2 with 12-2? Is this correct? What would be the worse scenario if I was to leave all the 14-2 and it was connected to 20 amp?
 
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Old 09-10-04, 07:04 PM
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All the work is wrong because you used 14-gauge wire on a 20-amp circuit, not because of what some electrician said. Did he/she say specifically that it was okay to use 14-gauge wire on a 20-amp circuit? I doubt it.

Yes, you should replace all the 14/2 with 12/2.

Worst scenario is that the wire will overheat causing your house will burn down, making your wife so mad that she divorces you, turning you to alcoholism and theft, landing you in prison where you will be exposed to hardened criminals, thus turning to violent crime when you are released on parole, leading to a conviction on a capital charge, and landing you on death row. And the fire kills you dog.
 
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Old 09-10-04, 07:18 PM
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The other solution is to replace the 20A breaker with a 15A breaker unless it is a circuit in your kitchen that requires a 20A circuit, then you need to replace the wire with #12 as described in detail by John.
 
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Old 09-11-04, 12:07 AM
rj1kender
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RON, if I replace the circuit breakers with 15 amp, here is what I have. I have 4 gfic plugs and a trash compactor on 1 circuit, then I have a dishwasher, garbage disposal and a small cabinet light on 1 circuit, then I have the refrigerator and hood vent on 1 circuit. Are these okay to put in 15 amp?
 
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Old 09-11-04, 07:28 AM
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Where exactly are the "4 gfic plugs"?
 
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Old 09-11-04, 09:46 AM
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John's question is important. Countertop or dining room receptacle must be on 20A circuits.
The other circuits can be converted to 15A, and if you experience tripping breakers, you know its overloaded. There's no magic answer as you equipment sizes matter, as well as how you use them.
 
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Old 09-11-04, 05:41 PM
rj1kender
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all 4 of the gfic plugs are on the counter wall, and 1 under the sink for the disposal.
 
  #10  
Old 09-11-04, 06:25 PM
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There's at least a dozen code violations here. It's hard to figure out what to fix first. I suggest you have an electrician come in and give you an evaluation. If you want to do this yourself, read up on some codes first. I suggest the $6 green paperback available in the electrical aisle of Home Depot titled "Wiring Simplified." You will probably need to rewire your whole kitchen.
 
  #11  
Old 09-15-04, 09:47 AM
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I totally agree

In a case like that I would just tear the whole house down and build a new one; better to be safe than sorry.
 
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