Adding recessed lights to existing plug/switch

Reply

  #1  
Old 09-14-04, 09:40 AM
digimon
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Question Adding recessed lights to existing plug/switch

I would like to add 4 recessed lights to an existing swith that has a plug on it only. The plug is control by the switch ie, lamp table use switch to turn on and off. It seems to be the only thing on that switch. What I would like to do is use that wall switch to add 3 to 5 recessed lights in the ceiling. I know that I will have to fish the line but should I connect to the plug near the floor or at the switch? any help would be great! Thank You ....
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 09-14-04, 10:45 AM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Central New York State
Posts: 13,973
Whether to connect your new line to the switch or to the recepticle depends on how the existing circuit is wired and also on whether you want the recepticle to remain switched with the lights or if you want it to always be on.

Start by providing us a description of all the wires at the switch and at the recepticle and how they are connected. Include detailed information and tell us aboutall wires, even those that don't connect to the recepticle or switch.

Second, decide about the recepticle. Let us know your decision.
 
  #3  
Old 09-14-04, 12:27 PM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: United States
Posts: 18,497
Also tell us whether it is easier to fish a new cable to the switch box or to the receptacle box, or if it's equally difficult. And tell us whether the receptacle is fully switched (both halves) or whether only one half is switched.

Fishing the new cable to the receptacle box will always work. Fishing the new cable to the switch box will work too, but you might (or might not) have to make the receptacle unswitched to do so.
 
  #4  
Old 09-17-04, 07:34 AM
digimon
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Re: Adding recessed lighting

Ok, Thank you for the help! ...Here's the description of what's going on. I have a 3 switch box near my front door in my living room. One switch controls a foyer light over head, one controls my outside porch lights and one controls a plug receptacle for a lamp(fully switched). I would like to add 3 recessed lights in the living room and would like to use one of the switches to control them with a dimmer. The plug can remain hot. I don't need the switch to control it if I install the recessed lighting. I looked at the receptacle and the switch box. Here is what is inside. The Receptacle has one wire coming in (one white and one black) Black connected to brass and white connected to silver no ground? Thats it for that. Now at the switch becomes more confusing for the normal guy. This has 3 switches, there are 4 wires wires coming into the box. All the white wires (4) are connected together. There are (6) black wire connections?. 1st switch on left that controls ceiling light has one black connected on the left screw and one black wire connected on the right side screw. The 2nd (middle, porch)switch has 2 black wires connected on the left side screw and one connected on the right side screw. (The 2nd wire looks like it is going to the 3rd switch right accross the back.) The 3rd switch the controls the (plug) has one black wire connected on the left screw and one black wire on the right screw. It would be easier to connect power from the ceiling light since I want to install recessed lighting in the ceiling but I don't want that foyer light and the recessed lights to work on the same switch. Could I connect in the ceiling to draw power for the recessed and put a switch somewhere else in the room that would be connected to the recessed lights? Or could I connect to the switch that controls the plug and run it upwards. that would be easier that going to the floor for the plug receptacle? I know this is kind of long but thank you so much for the replies.
 
  #5  
Old 09-17-04, 07:44 AM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Central New York State
Posts: 13,973
What you have is power (neutral and hot) coming into the switch box and then switched power (switched hot and neutral) going to the various lights.

This means that you need to make your connection in this box if you want to have the receptacle always hot and the new lights switched.

Your other alternative is to grab power from some other source (none of these lights) and then run a new switch somewhere for the new lights.

Do you think that you can add a wire to this existing switch box?
 
  #6  
Old 09-17-04, 07:58 AM
digimon
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
I think there is enough room probably to add one more wire coming in on the left side of the box. I would have to fish a wire to the ceiling then work in the attic. For the other lights.

Since I want to make the plug always "hot" and use the switch for the the lights, how should I connect inside the existing switch box? ... Thanks again.
 
  #7  
Old 09-17-04, 08:06 AM
digimon
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Me again,
I could draw power from one of the bedroom ceiling lights that used to have a roof vent fan connected to it before I had the roof done.
Then I could run a new switch some where else in the room. Would probably be the same amount if work to run the new switch as it would to fish the line to the existing box and it would cleaner.
What do you think?
 
  #8  
Old 09-17-04, 09:45 AM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Central New York State
Posts: 13,973
Where you get power for these lights and how you switch them is a matter of choice. I would consider the ease or difficulty of running the wires, the load on the circuit when you add thr new lights, and where you want thee switch.

To rewire the existing setup for the receptacle to be always on and a new oline switched, do the following:

Remove the black wire that goes to the receptacle from the switch and connect it to the always hot black wire in the box( this is the black wire that goes to all three switches).

Snake the new cable into the box. Connect the white wire to the other white wires. Conect the black wire to the now vacant screw on the switch. Connect the ground to the other grounds or to the box itself.
 
  #9  
Old 09-17-04, 11:00 AM
digimon
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Thank you very much for the information! I do have one more question.
I recently discovered that none of my wire have ground wires. You mentioned to connect the ground. If my wires have no ground should I buy 14/2 wire to connect to recessed lighting?
 
  #10  
Old 09-17-04, 12:52 PM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: United States
Posts: 18,497
If you don't have grounding wires, perhaps you have metal conduit that provides grounding. Can you tell?

Note that if you have no grounding at all, code prohibits you from extending these circuits.
 
  #11  
Old 09-17-04, 04:12 PM
digimon
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
No, I don't believe that I have any metal conduit that supplies a ground. I found out that all my outlets are open ground. I will have to run a new circuit to the circuit breaker. Thank you very much for all of your help. !
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes