Two lights controlled by one switch

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  #1  
Old 09-16-04, 12:52 PM
GOAWAY113
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Question Two lights controlled by one switch

Quick question about lighting. We have two lights that we always want to work in tandem...either both on or both off. They are currently controlled by separate switches on the same face plate.

Would it be safe to replace the separate switches with one switch and connect both lights to that one switch??

I haven't popped the face plate off yet, so I haven't taken a close look at the connections. I can fill in any necessary information tonight when I get started.

Thanks,
Mike
 
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Old 09-16-04, 01:11 PM
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It all depends. Are the lights controlled by the same circuit breaker, or are they different breakers.

If you don't know the answer to that question then you need to find out. While you are at, figure out what circuit breaker controls each and every recepticle, ficture, and appliance in your house. This information is invaluable in an emergency.

After you determine if the lights are on the same circuit breaker, you need to determine the wiring in the switch box and possible at the lights. Tell us all the wires in the switch box and how they are connected.
 
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Old 09-16-04, 01:51 PM
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If they are on the same circuit, it's always going to be possible, no matter how they are currently wired.
 
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Old 09-16-04, 01:55 PM
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Yes John, but if they each have a switch loop and nothing else you might need to run a new cable to keep current balanced in each cable.
 
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Old 09-16-04, 02:43 PM
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racraft,

What are you talking about?
 
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Old 09-16-04, 02:44 PM
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I'm not sure this is the proper thread to discuss this, but I have recently read some interesting material which has caused me to question the code requirements to balance that current in non-metallic cable anyway. Although the balance was definitely required in the 1996 code, changes in the 1999 code seem to make it not required any longer for non-metallic cable. If you're interested in pursuing this, please start a new thread.
 
  #7  
Old 09-16-04, 04:47 PM
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No John, we don't need to start a thread on this. Whether required or not, I still prefer to match the current each way in a cable. I take it that you see my point, and I see yours, so we can leave it at that. I think we have lost the original poster and confused Steve, who has joined the discussion.
 
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