should be 220v

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  #1  
Old 09-26-04, 12:59 PM
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Question should be 220v

I recently had a liscensed electrician wire a tanning bed in my home and when I plugged it in I discovered that it was wire for 110 instead of 220. It is a 20 amp single pole breaker and a dedicated line. The wire is 10 gauge. What needs to be done to correct this situation?
 
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Old 09-26-04, 01:03 PM
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If you told him in advance that the tanning bed was 220 volts, call him back and have him fix it for free. If you didn't tell him, call him back anyway and pay him to fix it. By the way, if you really had a 110-volt receptacle and a 220-volt tanning bed, you would not have physically been able to plug it in. The plug prongs are incompatible.
 
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Old 09-26-04, 01:06 PM
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Originally Posted by John Nelson
If you told him in advance that the tanning bed was 220 volts, call him back and have him fix it for free. If you didn't tell him, call him back anyway and pay him to fix it.

I did tell him the problem is that he was a friend of a friend whom I can no longer contact. I have done some breaker wiring ibn the past and would like to know if changing the wiring is all that is involved.
 
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Old 09-26-04, 01:11 PM
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The fix involves changing the breaker and changing the receptacle and changing the connections at each end. The wiring remains.

Could you physically insert the prongs of the plug of the tanning bed into the slots in the receptacle? That should not have been possible. Exactly what do the plug prongs and receptacle slots look like?
 
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Old 09-26-04, 01:13 PM
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Originally Posted by John Nelson
The fix involves changing the breaker and changing the receptacle and changing the connections at each end. The wiring remains.

Could you physically insert the prongs of the plug of the tanning bed into the slots in the receptacle? That should not have been possible. Exactly what do the plug prongs and receptacle slots look like?
The receptacle is correct....it is a NEMA 6-20 and had been in a previous house with the same tanning bed. What type of breaker do I need
 
  #6  
Old 09-26-04, 01:16 PM
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Anyone who puts a 6-20 on a single-pole breaker is not an electrician. Did you see his license? If so, report him.

You need a 20-amp double-pole breaker. Don't confuse this with a tandem breaker. The breaker will be twice as wide as the one in there now.
 
  #7  
Old 09-26-04, 01:18 PM
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Okay, so I can report him but I would still like to know if I can fix this myself, and if so what do I need to do
 
  #8  
Old 09-26-04, 01:21 PM
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Buy a 20-amp double-pole (not tandem) breaker. Install it in two slots of your panel (one above the other). Assuming that this circuit is wired with one black wire and one white wire, move the white wire for that circuit from the neutral bar to one screw on the breaker, and connect the black wire to the other screw. Be advised that there is still deadly power in your panel even with the main breaker turned off, and that you can get killed merely with the act of removing the cover if you're not careful.
 
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Old 09-26-04, 01:24 PM
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Originally Posted by John Nelson
Buy a 20-amp double-pole (not tandem) breaker. Install it in two slots of your panel (one above the other). Assuming that this circuit is wired with one black wire and one white wire, move the white wire for that circuit from the neutral bar to one screw on the breaker, and connect the black wire to the other screw. Be advised that there is still deadly power in your panel even with the main breaker turned off, and that you can get killed merely with the act of removing the cover if you're not careful.
Thank you for the info....I am assuming that the wire is of a sufficient gauge.
 
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Old 09-26-04, 01:27 PM
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It's more than sufficient, which also calls into question the skills of the "electrician".
 
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Old 09-26-04, 01:35 PM
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Originally Posted by John Nelson
It's more than sufficient, which also calls into question the skills of the "electrician".
Thanks so much for taking the time to help me. I have one last question....can I use a 30 amp double pole or does it have to be a 20 amp
 
  #12  
Old 09-26-04, 01:37 PM
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Has to be 20. You are not allowed to put a 6-20 on a 30-amp breaker.
 
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