Cost of wiring a garage

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  #1  
Old 10-13-04, 04:59 AM
agrenvik
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Cost of wiring a garage

I asked a guy at work, who is an electrician, what he would charge for wiring a garage. He said he charges by the outlets that he wires and I have around 15 of them including the ceiling plugs. At a price of $1000, which included all the wiring and a sub panel I thought this was outrages, but I went with him since he was recommended to me by the guy in charge of the contractors at work. I watched him do the work on a Saturday and he finished 90% in 8 hours and will finish the rest, hopefully today. I asked questions on why he was drilling so many holes, ok most are necessary, but he said some of it is overkill just in case more wiring is needed. I bought a breaker box and he was not satisfied with the looks of it even though it was a Siemens with 8 breakers. He purchased one that he preferred. Also, he tore down some of the blue boxes that I had put up since they were not strong enough. Should he also have cleaned up his mess after the drilling in the 2x4 studs?

I have paid him half the cost and will need to pay him the balance when he is finished. Should I mention the above mess and that he should deduct the price of some the electric boxes?

Thanks
 
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Old 10-13-04, 05:31 AM
sjr
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Do you have a contract with him for the work? If so, what does it say?
 
  #3  
Old 10-13-04, 05:35 AM
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You are asking many questions. Before discussing your specific situation, it is better to discuss generalities first.

When hiring someone to work in your house, be it for electrical work or any work, it is always best to have a written agreement in place. Both parties need to know and agree on what the other party is doing. This is especially important when it comes to cleanup and supplying your own materials.

Many electricians won't let a homeowner supply their own materials or do any of the work. The reasons are twofold. At a minimum, the electrician will have to make sure that the homeowners work is up to par, that is up to code. Also, as you have found out, some electricians don't like to use particular brand or quality products. For example, I know an electrician who refuses to use plastic boxes, he insists on all metal.

There are also some electricians who won't repair drywall or do any repainting. While they may do their best to minimize the damage to drywall, they still won't repair it.

Now to your situation.

What agreement did you make with this electrician? If you have a written agreement (and you should), does it indicate who will do the cleanup? Does it indicate that the electrician will supply all the materials? Did you discuss your doing some of the work or supplying some of the materials to lower the cost?
 
  #4  
Old 10-13-04, 09:17 AM
agrenvik
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Originally Posted by racraft
You are asking many questions. Before discussing your specific situation, it is better to discuss generalities first.

When hiring someone to work in your house, be it for electrical work or any work, it is always best to have a written agreement in place. Both parties need to know and agree on what the other party is doing. This is especially important when it comes to cleanup and supplying your own materials.

Many electricians won't let a homeowner supply their own materials or do any of the work. The reasons are twofold. At a minimum, the electrician will have to make sure that the homeowners work is up to par, that is up to code. Also, as you have found out, some electricians don't like to use particular brand or quality products. For example, I know an electrician who refuses to use plastic boxes, he insists on all metal.

There are also some electricians who won't repair drywall or do any repainting. While they may do their best to minimize the damage to drywall, they still won't repair it.

Now to your situation.

What agreement did you make with this electrician? If you have a written agreement (and you should), does it indicate who will do the cleanup? Does it indicate that the electrician will supply all the materials? Did you discuss your doing some of the work or supplying some of the materials to lower the cost?
I did not have a written agreement, since we basically drew up the plans on what outlet goes where, while he visited my office desk. He verbally mentioned that he would supply all the material, even though I indicated that I put the blue boxes in the locations I wanted. I also had the sub box on the wall that I was going to use. He said it was not an acceptable box to his standards. Without asking he just pulled some of them and destroyed them. He even put a box where I did not want one. Again, he said it is overkill. I was doing my own work on the garage that day, so I was at his side for most of the work he was doing. I am a clean as you go type of individual, so I thought it may be true with him.
 
  #5  
Old 10-13-04, 09:22 AM
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He did the work and supplied the materials agreed upon. Pay him.
 
  #6  
Old 10-13-04, 12:35 PM
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I can't see quibbling over who sweeps up the sawdust. And it's certainly within his scope to reject the materials that you purchased and that he found unsuitable. The fact that he destroyed two dollars worth of cheap blue boxes is not that big of a deal.
 
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