Switch/Receptacle GFCI

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  #1  
Old 10-13-04, 01:40 PM
Ray S
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Switch/Receptacle GFCI

I'm trying to replace a switch/Receptacle without GFCI with one that has GFCI. I follow the instructions up to point. I have two cables coming into the box with a black and white wire in each. I can identify the load wires. I can hook them up to the terminals. I can hook up the line wires to the appropriate terminals. Now, what I don't understand is what do I do with the two black wires that came with the Switch/receptacle. They stick out of the back of the switch/receptacle. The switch operates a light over the sink.
 
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  #2  
Old 10-13-04, 02:24 PM
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What do the instructions that came with the switch/receptacle tell you to do?

What do the instructions say that the terminals on the switch receptacle are for?

What are your wires for? Two of them (one pair) will be incoming power, a hot and a neutral. What are the outgoing wires? Are they the hot and the neutral for the light?
 
  #3  
Old 10-13-04, 02:41 PM
Ray S
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Understanding the instructions is the problem. Two wires, black and white are load wires the other two are line wires. (this is what the instructions call them. They also identify the connections on the receptacle the same way. Are you familiar with a switch/receptacle GFCI? There are two load connections and two line connections plus two wires sticking out the back of the receptacle that must go somewhere.
 
  #4  
Old 10-13-04, 03:01 PM
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Not all switch receptacles are created equal. The one that I installed a little less than a month ago does not have any wires. In fact, I have never seen one with wires, but then again I don't work with these devices every day either.

There are six connections on a switch receptacle (not counting the ground connection). You do not necessarily need to use all six.

There will be two line inputs. Connect your incoming hot and return to these connections.

The other connections are two load connections and two switch connections.

You still haven't told me what the other wires in your switch box are for. I am going to assume that they are the switched hot and the neutral for the light. The directions below assume this.

Decide if you want the light to be GFCI protected. I recommend against this, but the choice is yours to make.

If you want the light GFCI protected then connect the load hot connection to one of the switch connections. Connect the other switch connection to the light hot wire. Connect the light neutral to the load neutral.

If you don't want the light to be GFCI protected then connect one of the switch connections to the line hot. Connect the other switch connection to the light hot wire. Connect the light neutral to the line neutral. Note that you may need pigtails to make some of these connections.
 

Last edited by racraft; 10-14-04 at 12:09 PM.
  #5  
Old 10-14-04, 05:51 AM
Ray S
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Thanks. This is one of the schemes I came up with after reading the directions that came with the switch. I just wasn't sure. The two wires sticking out the back of the switch are indeed the switch wires. They are so labeled. Now to recapitulate. I hook up the line wires black and white. I hook up the line wires black and white. Now I take one of those wires sticking out the back of the switch and hook it up to the hot line connection and the other wire to the hot load connection. Do I have it?
 
  #6  
Old 10-14-04, 05:56 AM
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That sound correct.
 
  #7  
Old 10-14-04, 12:03 PM
Ray S
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I did what we discussed and I wound up with a switched receptacle. In other words the switch has to be on for the receptacle to be on. This is no good because I don't want the overhead light on when all I want on is a night light in the receptacle. There is one more thing that I didn't mention. The instructions also says to connect the white wire of the load to the line side of the white wire. I did this. I wish I could draw you a diagram of what I did . Do you know of any way I could do this? (I was a draftsman many, many years ago.)
 
  #8  
Old 10-14-04, 12:09 PM
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My directions above tell you to connect the light neutral on the line neutral.

If the switch is switching the receptacle then you have the wires backwards.

The incoming power should be connected to the line terminals. Connect one of the switch connections to the line hot. Connect the other switch connection to the light hot wire. Connect the light neutral to the line neutral. Note that you may need pigtails to make some of these connections, because you can only have one wire under each screw terminal.
 
  #9  
Old 10-15-04, 12:37 PM
Ray S
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I'm really having trouble. What would you think if I told you that if I hook up my hot black wire to the hot side LOAD connection on the switch and the white wire from the same cable to the white terminal on the LINE connection the switch works!
On the other hand If I hook up the hot black wire to the Line brass connection and the white wire from the same cable to the white screw opposite, the receptacle does not work. If I put the testor on both of these screws the light lights up but if I put the testor in both the plug holes there is no power. This seems illogical. I'm testing you patience. Is there something screwed up with my house wiring?
 
  #10  
Old 10-15-04, 01:07 PM
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I would say that you don't have things wired properly.

How was the old switch/receptacle wired?

If you don't know that then open up the light and provide a complete detail of the wiring at the light, without disconnecting anything.
 
  #11  
Old 10-15-04, 04:21 PM
Ray S
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The original switch/receptacle is wired as follows.
The hot black wire is connected to the brass screw opposite the switch. (on the left side)
The other black wire is attached to the screw opposite. (on the other side of the switch. the right side)
The two white wires are connected to each other and connect to the screw on the right side of the receptacle.
The screw on the left side of the receptacle is unused.
 
  #12  
Old 10-15-04, 07:07 PM
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Check your wiring very carefully, You have made a mistake somewhere.
 
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