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Converting a 4 wire hardwired Oven outlet into a regular outlet

Converting a 4 wire hardwired Oven outlet into a regular outlet

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  #1  
Old 10-14-04, 08:32 AM
cheeku
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Converting a 4 wire hardwired Oven outlet into a regular outlet

I pulled out a 45 year old double oven that was hardwired to a 4 wire (1 black, 1 red, 1 white and a bare wire). This is on a dedicated 30A circuit, I think the oven works at 220V.

I have converted that space into a kitchen cupboard and was intending to convert this wiring into a regular 110V socket so that I can attach my Panasonic Microwave oven (using a regular 3 pin plug).

How can I do this?

Thanks
Srikanth
 
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  #2  
Old 10-14-04, 08:57 AM
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Location: Central New York State
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You can do this, but you should consider whether you want to or not. Unless it would be very difficult to run a new wire, I would leave this circuit intact and run a completely new circuit.

However, to do what you want.

You need to remove the 30 amp 240 breaker and install 1 20 amp 120 breaker. The red wire will have to be capped at both ends. The black wire will connect to the new breaker. The white wire will connect to the neutral bus (ehere it probably already is) and the ground wire connects to the ground bus (where it should be now).

At the wall end you install a box for the receptacle. You then put a 15 or 20 amp duplex receptacle into the box. Alternately you can use a 20 amp sungle (non-duplex) receptacle. You will need to use 12 gauge pigtails (short pieces of 12 gauge wire) and wire nuts to connect the larger circuit wire to the receptacle. Again, at the receptacle the red wire is to be capped off and not used.
 
  #3  
Old 10-14-04, 09:03 AM
cheeku
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Hey Thanks for the quick response. Looks like it might be better to run a new wire from another junction box that runs on a 20 amp circuit. I have a light switch close by, which I guess I can tap and run a new wire.

What will be the best way to cap the entire 30amp ciruit out. Will the shutting of the circuit breaker be enough or additionally cap it on the output side.

By the way what is the safest way to cap the 30amp circuit?

Thanks
tups...srikanth
 
  #4  
Old 10-14-04, 09:07 AM
cheeku
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Forgot to add (as you might already have figured out that I am a novice at this!).

Can I just cap off the red wire at both ends and start using the existing 20amp dual receptacle with just the black wire. Can I avoid replacing the 30amp breaker with the 20amp breaker?

Thanks
Srikanth
 
  #5  
Old 10-14-04, 09:12 AM
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I would not run your microwave off an existing circuit. This would be asking for trouble. Run a new circuit for the microwave.

To cap off the 30 amp circuit you have two choices.

1) You can install a permanently accessible junction box or a receptacle on the end and not use the circuit by simply turning the breaker off. The wires either terminate in the junction box with wire nuts over the end, or they attach to the receptacle.

2) You can remove the wire from the circuit breaker panel and leave it in place. If you shoce this options you should identify each end of the cable as "NOT IN USE" or "DISCONNECTED" or something similar.

No, you absolutely positevely cannot use half the 30 amp breaker to power a 120 volt receptacle. This is dangerous and a code violation.
 
  #6  
Old 10-14-04, 09:28 AM
cheeku
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So the best and safest solution will be what you had suggested initially!

What do I have to do to replace the 30 amp breaker with a 20 amp breaker. Assuming I cap off the red wire, Is there a cheat sheet that you can point me to?




Thanks
Srikanth
 
  #7  
Old 10-14-04, 10:13 AM
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Location: Central New York State
Posts: 13,973
If you have a spare slot in your breaker panel you don't necessarily have to remove the 30 amp 240 volt breaker. You could add the new 20 amp 120 volt breaker, leaving the 30 amp breaker in place.

If you don't feel comfortable opening the panel to make this change then I advise you to call an electrician. Electricity can kill. Working in a main panel is not for the faint of heart.


If you really want to proceed on your own, I would suggest that you buy one or more books on home electricity and read them. They will explain all you need to know.
 

Last edited by racraft; 10-14-04 at 11:00 AM.
  #8  
Old 10-14-04, 10:59 AM
cheeku
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Thanks I will do that.
Srikanth
 
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