Removing a 220 plug?

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  #1  
Old 10-28-04, 06:46 PM
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Removing a 220 plug?

I just installed a gas stove, where before we had electric. The electric had a 220 outlet behind the stove which is now in the way and preventing me from pushing the stove all the way back to the wall. I would like to remove the outlet. Can I simply turn of the breaker for the outlet, tie off the wires and remove the plug box? Or do I need to have an electrician come take care of it?
 
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Old 10-28-04, 07:05 PM
sjr
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I believe that whenever possible, obsolete wiring is to be removed, but if it is not possible, then it can be left. I would definitely disconnect the wire from the breaker and pull it out of the breaker box as well. You should replace the breaker after you do this, or put blanks in its place. Don't just disconnect the wire from the receptacle and leave the breaker in place, but turned off. The next occupant won't know why it's there but turned off and may turn it on causing a fire hazard.
 
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Old 10-28-04, 07:10 PM
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Okay, so how do I remove the wire from the breaker? And, do I just replace the old breaker but without a wire and note it as not being connected/
 
  #4  
Old 10-28-04, 07:14 PM
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If at all possible I would leave the wiring in place, attached to a receptacle. You never know when someone else may want to connect an electric stove.

However, if the receptacle has to go (and it sounds like it does) you have several options.

You can remove the receptacle, pull the wires through the floor and reinstall the receptacle in the basement (assuming an unfinished basement below). In this case you don't need to do anything with the breaker except turn it off.

You can remove the receptacle and leave the wiring in place. In this case you need to disconnect it from the breaker and take it out of the circuit breaker panel. However, you don;t need to remove the breaker. There is nothing wrong with a breaker that does nothing. Simply change the legend to say unused. You should also mark the wire as unused on both ends.

Finally, you can completely remove the wire and get rid of it. Again, mark the breaker as unused and leave it turned off.
 
  #5  
Old 10-28-04, 07:25 PM
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Can I install the 220 outlet into the wall like a normal outlet? It is drywall. Currenty the outlet is run up through the floor.
 
  #6  
Old 10-29-04, 04:12 AM
sjr
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Yes, there are range receptacles that fit in ordinary wall boxes. The only thing to remember is that if you are going to move the location of the range receptacle, you need to make sure it is up to current code. This means that it needs to be a 4-prong (2 hots, neutral, ground) receptacle and therefore needs to be run with cable that supports this (i.e. 8/3 or 6/3). If your cable only has two insulated conductors, then I would recommend against this.
 
  #7  
Old 10-29-04, 04:37 AM
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It would be up to interpretation whether changing a receptacle from surface mount to recessed mount would require bringing the circuit up to code. Some inspectors would say no, others would say yes.
 
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