installation of service panel

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  #1  
Old 10-29-04, 11:38 PM
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installation of service panel

I would like to have a new breaker panel installed. The one we have now does not have a main breaker shut off, which I want. I am interested in the process involved in this. Do I get the permit or does the electrician? Who notifies the power company to cut the power? And for how long is the power generally off? Inspection....When whowever comes out to inspect the work will they just inspect that the panel box was done correctly or will they go snooping around to see if they can find faults, like no GFCI's in the kitchen or bathrooms? Or the dishwasher and garbage disposal are on the same circuit. I'd hate to open a can of worms.
 
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Old 10-30-04, 05:37 AM
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The amount of time that the power will be off depends on the amount of work that needs to be done. If only the panel needs to be replaced, the power will be out less time than if the cable from the meter to the panel needs to be replaced, or if the meter box needs to be replaced. Plan on several hours, but make sure to ask questions when you get estimates. When my panel was off. My power was out for about one hour the first day and for about two hours the second day. (My job was done over two days because it involved moving the meter and running new cable, which had to be coordinated with the power company.)

Sometimes the electrician will pull the permit, sometimes the homeowner will do it. If you as homeowner need to do it you may need to take your estimate with you, as sometimes the cost of the permit depends on the cost of the job.

There is no requirement to bring the rest of the house up to code when you only replace the circuit breaker panel. The fact that you don't have GFCI protection in your kitchen or bathroom is not relevant to this job, and may not be against code, depending on when those circuits were installed. Now if the inspector sees something imminently dangerous, such as bare conductors in the basement or exposed connections (not in junction boxes), then he or she may say something or take action, but they can't go snooping and they cannot look outside the scope of the work performed.

By the way, there is no code violation in having the garbage disposal and dishwasher on the same circuit.
 
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Old 10-30-04, 08:15 AM
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Under what circumstances would the meter box need to be replaced or the cables from the meter to the panel be replaced?
 
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Old 10-30-04, 11:35 AM
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There are several instances in which it would be necessary to replace the meter box and the cable. Therre are several instances in which it would be a good idea to replace the meter box or the cable.

If the existing service is only 60 amps, for example, it woild be wise to upgradeto at least 100 amp, possibly more. If the electrician determines that the existing cable is somehow damaged then it would need to be replaced. If damage is detected to the meter panel when the meter is removed then the meter panel would need to be replaced.
 
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