Replacing light bulbs - often

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Old 11-09-04, 02:21 PM
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Replacing light bulbs - often

I live in a condo that is apartment style. It seems to me the light bulbs burn out way to fast in many of the fixtures and lamps. What can cause this?

Also I see halogen bulbs where it says something like 15W - equivalent to 60 W incadescent bulb. If your fixture is rated for a 60W bulb can you go larger with a halogen? I really don't understand this at all.
 
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Old 11-09-04, 02:37 PM
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There are several reasons that bulbs burn out too fast.

One reason is cheap bulbs. Have you tried different brands of bulbs?

Another reason is improper voltage. If the voltage is too high, then the bulb will burn out faster. Check the voltage (or have it checked) at the panel and at various receptacles.


As for the rating on a fixture. The common reason for a rating is due to heat. With incandescent bulbs, the higher the wattage, the more heat that is generated. Manufacturers specify a particular wattage so that the heat generated by the bulb will not cause a fire.

When manufacturers of other type bulbs specify that their 15 watt is equivalent to a 60 watt incandescent, they are referring to light output, not heat output. Consult the manufacturer of the bulb and/or of the fixture to decide the maximum wattage bulb when you switch to something other than a traditional incandescent bulb.
 
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Old 11-10-04, 09:07 AM
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Thanks Bob. I have used all types and brands of bulbs with similar poor results. When I check the voltage what would you consider a good range? I have heard that what we call 110 volt is actually 120. If the voltage is too high what is the fix?
 
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Old 11-10-04, 10:05 AM
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Generally you want to see 120 volts on each half of your incoming service. Make sure that you measure both halves of the incoming service.

If one is noticeably higher, and the other noticeably lower, then call the power company.
 
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