Arizona State Exam Questions Help


  #1  
Old 11-15-04, 09:09 AM
rikamy
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Arizona State Exam Questions Help

I have recently taken the C-11 Arizona State Electricians Exam and missed
by 1 question. A couple of questions taken from the test that I was unsure of
maybe someone here will have the answer to.. The test is based on the
1999 Nec.

1) When using a meg meter "megger" and testing a motor, if the motor is
considered to be good the reading should read:

1) no resistance
2) some resistance
3) a lot of resistance

I have never used a meg meter and do stricly residential, can't remember
what answer I gave.

2) What does a 50 amp 120volt oultlet look like... they gave 4 pictures.?
 
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Old 11-15-04, 09:30 AM
J
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Old 11-15-04, 01:34 PM
rikamy
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Exam Questions

Thanks John !

I couldn't find it anywhere... the 50 amp single pole question... any insight on the megger question I posted, I'm getting ready to retake the exam, probably won't run into it again, but just in case... Also another question that kinda stumped me was when replacing an 2 prong outlet.. what can you
replace it with.. an grounded outlet,,, a gfci .,,,, or another 2 prong outlet??


Thanks for your help!
 
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Old 11-15-04, 02:02 PM
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A megger is a specialty insulation/resistance tester. The answer depends on what thing the two leads are connected to and the type of motor.
http://ecmweb.com/mag/electric_testi...ave/index.html
http://www.hipot.com/faqs/insulation.shtml
 
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Old 11-15-04, 02:34 PM
J
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Code allows you to replace a two-hole receptacle with:
(1) another two-hole receptacle,
(2) a GFCI-protected three-hole receptacle, or
(3) a three-hole receptacle without GFCI if grounding is present.

By the way, you might as well start using the proper terminology. Call a receptacle a receptacle, not an outlet. If you don't know the difference, study up because you'll need to.
 
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Old 11-15-04, 02:51 PM
rikamy
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Exam Questions

Thanx ..... I mean Thanks for your help John... As for the terminology, its just a little quicker on the keyboard if ya get my drift.. Answered all my questions and have a great day!
 
 

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