Finding GFCI

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  #1  
Old 11-16-04, 11:24 AM
tizzo
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Finding GFCI

I have a relatively new house (2001). I am in the process of selling the house. Last night, my buyers had their home inspection done. The inspector identified a single outlet in the kitchen that is not GFCI protected. This outlet, and a second one hidden inside a cabinet and to which the built-in microwave is connected, are the only ones in the kitchen that are not protected (other than the fridge).

My first question is whether this outlet would be required to be GFCI protected. I'm not an electrician, and not familiar with electrical codes. The outlet isn't close to the sink or any other water source. I was wondering if proximity to the sink was a factor in determining whether an outlet must be GFCI protected or not.

My second question is, is there any way to go about finding the GFCI receptacle that controls a given outlet? I've been all through the house, and tripped every GFCI that I could find. I am almost certain that I got all of them, but none of them turns off this outlet. At the same time, I had the home inspected myself when I bought it, and there was no mention of an outlet that wasn't GFCI protected (and I know he checked them). My thinking is that the outlet either isn't required to be protected, or is protected but I can't figure out from where. I've already accepted a below market value offer on the house, and I don't want to spend any money that I don't have to. Any information would be appreciated. Thanks.

Tony
 
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  #2  
Old 11-16-04, 11:30 AM
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For the last ten years, proximity to the sink has not been a consideration in GFCI requirements. Any kitchen receptacle serving the countertop requires GFCI protection.

You can easily find which outlets are protected by which GFCI. Simply trip the GFCI by pressing the TEST button. Everything that is now dead is protected by that GFCI. But it seems that your outlet is not GFCI protected. So of course it's impossible to find the GFCI that protects it. I suppose you're wondering which GFCI should protect it. That's harder.

But for $10-$15 and five minutes of work, you can put a GFCI receptacle in this box and be done with it.

Home inspectors often don't check every receptacle, but only a representative sample.
 
  #3  
Old 11-17-04, 01:02 PM
tizzo
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I called my builder, who referred to me to the electrical sub that did our development. They guy I spoke to said he probably wired my house himself. I explained the situation to him, told him that I tried all three of the GFCIs that I could find in the kitchen, and that none of them tripped the outlet in question. I asked him if there were any other places he would recommend looking for the GFCI that trips that outlet. He said that there are only the three that I already found in my kitchen, and that one of them should trip the outlet. He said if none of them do, then it was probably a mistake on his part, and if that's the case he'll fix it for free. He's coming out Friday to look at it. So from my point of view, problem solved. Thanks for the advice.

Tony
 
  #4  
Old 11-17-04, 03:54 PM
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Location: welland ontario
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Make sure you keep his name and number and call him next time you need more help. Sounds like good guy to know.
 
  #5  
Old 11-17-04, 05:26 PM
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Location: United States
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Before he gets there, look in the dining room and pantry for a GFCI too.
 
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