Changing over to three prong outlets

Reply

  #1  
Old 11-18-04, 06:28 PM
pamelak855
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Changing over to three prong outlets

Hi! We have just moved and I really wanted to install grounded outlets. However, there is no ground in the house. So, I decided to change the two prong receptacles to three ground anyway to accomodate my vacuum in the bedrooms. I also added one GFI to each room. I realize that none of these new outlets are really grounded, but now when I plug my tester into them, I get three lights, not just one for an "open ground" How do I know if I have installed them properly? Could they be "hot"? I followed the GFI instructions and tested it. Its working properly. It is also on the last receptacle in the line (the two wire receptacle). Thanks!

Pam
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 11-18-04, 07:53 PM
Member
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: NA
Posts: 1,065
Your on the right track Pamela. There are a few rules to follow when replacing 2-prong ungrounded outlets. You can replace them with another two prong outlet (obviously you dont want this). You can replace all receptacles with GFCI type (expensive). You can install a gfci "first in line" and then replace the other two prong receptacles on the circuit with normal grounded three prong receptacles, protecting them with the gfci installed upstream. Lastly you can install a gfci type circuit breaker (if possible)protecting all outlets on that branch circuit. All receptacles protected by gfci's must be labeled "gfci protected no equipment ground".
Most likely installing a gfci first in the circuit is your best bet then install normal 3 prong receptacles on the rest of this circuit. You would do this on all circuits not just one. You need to be sure that the outlets replaced are on the circuit with the gfci. Turn off the power first. The incoming power (line) will be connected to the gfci at its line terminals marked "line". Remove the tape from the load terminals of the gfci and connect the cable going to the rest of the receptacles to the "load" terminals. Then put the labels that come with the gfci on the cover plates of the other non-gfci 3 prong receptacles. Turn the power back on. Push the reset button on the gfci/gfci's to energize the circuit or circuits. Now push the test button to make sure the gfci trips and turns the power off. Push the reset button to turn the circuit back on. Test the gfci monthly.......GL
 
  #3  
Old 11-18-04, 08:41 PM
pamelak855
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Hi Roger and thanks for your reply. A couple of questions:

1. I assume I should remove the GFI from the last receptacle and change it to the first one on the circuit.

2. The circuit begins at a light switch. This switch works the outlet on the same wall. Then there are two others around that room. Should the GFI go on the reptacle powered by the light switch?

3. Since that receptacle has four wires (2 black and 2 white), how do I determine which are the line(power) cables, and which load the next receptacle?

4. Set up this way, will the GFI trip any of the other receptacles in the room on that circuit if there is a ground fault?

On a totally separate note, if one of the wires in the receptacle box is kind of "short", can I elongate it in any way by attaching more wire to it somehow?

Thank you so much!!

Pam
 
  #4  
Old 11-18-04, 10:19 PM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: United States
Posts: 18,497
1. It's your choice. As the last receptacle on the line, it protects only itself. As the first, it protects them all (well, maybe--depends on how the circuit is wired). GFCI is good, but it's not for everything. For example, you probably don't want your refrigerator or sump pump or smoke detectors on GFCI.

2. Again, it's your choice. There's no problem putting a GFCI in a switched outlet. However, that switched outlet is primarily for a lamp, and the lamp doesn't have a grounding prong anyway. So it might be better some place else, if you have an unswitched outlet in the room.

3. A simple two-buck neon circuit tester will tell you which pair is the line. With all the wires disconnected and the breaker on, the "line" will light up the tester but the "load" will not. However, today's GFCI receptacles have a light that tells you whether it is wired correctly, so you could just guess and then swap it if it is wrong.

4. The GFCI will trip if there is a ground fault at that outlet, or at any outlet on the load side of the GFCI.
 
  #5  
Old 11-19-04, 06:47 PM
Member
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: NA
Posts: 1,065
To answer your question about the short wire, you can add a short piece of wire with a wire nut making a "pigtail" then connect to gfci receptacle.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
'