How do I turn 220 into 110?

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  #1  
Old 11-30-04, 09:31 AM
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How do I turn 220 into 110?

I rented a building for my stained glass shop. The building had a kitchen in it. I would like to put a kiln where the stove was. The kiln runs on 110V, but has a "funny" plug - one of the prongs is turned. I am sure I can get a matching receptacle at the electrical shop, but I am not clear on changing the wiring. My dh used to do some electrical work, but he has never had to do this. It is my understanding that the 220V has two 110V wires, so if only one of the wires is used I would have 110V. Of course, dh thinks I know nothing, but he is only half right. Can someone give me directions that dh could follow to do this? If it doesn't come from me, he will listen.

RebeccaJHB
 
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  #2  
Old 11-30-04, 11:00 AM
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Does it look like this?


If so, this is a 20-amp 120-volt plug. It is very likely that the 240-volt receptacle you are looking at is connected to something larger than a 20-amp breaker. So you would need to replace the breaker in the panel and remake the connections there to have a separate neutral and grounding.

With more information, we can walk you through this. But as you can see, this is more involved than just replacing the receptacle, so you might want to consider professional help. If you want to pursue this yourself, start by telling us
  1. Exactly what the current receptacle looks like. Specifically, we need to know how many holes or slits and how they are arranged. If you want, find the receptacle on this chart.
  2. What number is on the handle of the breaker that controls power to the current receptacle?
 
  #3  
Old 11-30-04, 05:41 PM
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If you are renting this building then you cannot (and should not) do this work yourself. You need to work out with the landlord for an electrician to do the work.
 
  #4  
Old 12-01-04, 08:46 AM
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As to getting the landlord to do anything - Ha!

The kiln that I want to install says on the nameplate: "120V 15a" and the plug configuration looks like 5-20 P.

The receptacle where the stove was says: "50a 125.250" and the plug configuration looks like 10-20 P.

The breaker in the box says: "2 pole Type MP-T 10,000 120/240 V.A.C." and there is a 50 on each of the handles.

Rebecca
 
  #5  
Old 12-01-04, 11:59 AM
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Take a look at the existing receptacle again. Are you sure it doesn't look more like 10-50R rather than 10-20R? The difference is subtle. The only difference is which slot is slightly longer.

At any rate, you should not attempt this task unless you are comfortable working inside the panel. You'll need to replace the 50-amp breaker with a 20-amp breaker (of the correct make and model to match the panel), and you'll need to move the white wire off the breaker (if there even is a white wire on the breaker) and on to the neutral bar. This is not a particularly good novice electrical job, and there are a few complications that might arise. Even if you were to do this, it might be easier to add a new circuit than try to convert this existing range circuit.
 
  #6  
Old 12-01-04, 02:23 PM
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You are right, John. I wrote down 10-50 first, but I was down on my knees with a magnifying glass and didn't have a micrometer with me. I will print all this out and show dh. Maybe it would be better to use a 110 V socket that is nearby. I actually wanted a 220 V kiln but got the 110 used for a good price.

Rebecca
 
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