Q: Installing a new 20Amp outlet in unfinished garage

Reply

  #1  
Old 12-10-04, 01:51 PM
jmondanaro
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Q: Installing a new 20Amp outlet in unfinished garage

I have been using my attached but unfinished garage as a workshop. It only had a small 15 amp outlet so I thought it would be worthwhile and safe to install one or two 20amp outlets for my tools. Here is my questions:

1) The garage is unfinished. THat means the box and wirring would be exposed. I thought this was a situation that would call for conduit to protect the cable but normally home wiring is NM-B 12/2 right which cannot be in full conduit. Do I a) Run the 12/2 in 1/2" conduit to the cieling where I can safely staple it along the joists and runners for the run to the panel. Or b) Not use NM-B but instead use THHN? and run the whole length in conduit?

2) My relatively brand new 200Amp panel is surface mounted in the garage with all the cable runs coming out and going up into the cieling to run back into the house. Now that the garage is getting more use I am worried about something catching a wire. Can I simply "extend" the wall out to the panel depth to cover up the wire runs?

Thanks,

Jason
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 12-10-04, 01:56 PM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Central New York State
Posts: 13,973
You can use conduit from the ceiling down to the receptacles to protect the cable.

Yes, you can and should cover the exposed wires that run up to the ceiling. I suggest a piece of plywood or something else that you can easily remove in case you need to add wires (such as you are doing now), rather than something permanent.
 
  #3  
Old 12-10-04, 01:57 PM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: United States
Posts: 18,497
It may be unfinished, but the spaces between the studs are not considered exposed. If you mount an electrical box to the studs and run the cable along the sides of the studs and through holes bored in the studs, no conduit is required.

If the situation above does not apply to you, and you must use conduit, then either of the two alternatives you presented is fine.

Exactly what do the walls of your unfinished garage look like? Are there studs? Is it block? Is there drywall?

(2) Yes.
 
  #4  
Old 12-10-04, 02:06 PM
jmondanaro
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
The walls are just Studs with the exterior sheathing plywood on the backs. The House is old so the studs are also only 2x4's so not very deep. I was planning on mounting an electrical box to the side of a stud. There is shelving that runs along that wall and it is things on the shelving that I am concerned about bumping and damaging the wire run. So that's why I was planning on conduit up to the cieling. Also, is 1/2" too small if I do use COnduit, does it need to be 3/4"?

-Jason
 
  #5  
Old 12-10-04, 02:17 PM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: United States
Posts: 18,497
12/2 fits in 1/2" EMT, but it's pretty snug. Make sure you file the rough edges off the ends of the conduit before inserting the cable, and straighten and unkink the cable before you put it in so that it doesn't get damaged. You might find PVC conduit easier to work with.

Most garages like yours are wired without conduit (including mine, and I added a bunch of extra receptacles too), but there's no harm in adding more protection if you think it warranted. You didn't say whether or not these new receptacles will be on new circuits, but I recommend it. Don't forget the GFCI.
 
  #6  
Old 12-10-04, 02:22 PM
jmondanaro
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Thanks

Yes, I was going to run each receptical box off of its own 20amp breaker. One last question, how do I protect the cable where it comes out of the conduit? DO I just file the edges to be nice a rounded, use a cheap orange plastic insert or use some sort of end clamp thing?

-Jason
 
  #7  
Old 12-10-04, 02:33 PM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: United States
Posts: 18,497
I'd put a regular fitting on it, the same kind of fitting you'd use to attach the conduit to a box. But you could probably get by with just filing it nice and smooth, rounding the sharp edges. Less of a problem if you use PVC.
 
  #8  
Old 12-11-04, 05:20 AM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Central New York State
Posts: 13,973
Make sure that you continue the cable straight for a few inches when it exits the conduit, and put in a staple before you turn it any direction. This will help keep the cable from rubbing the edges of the conduit. Whatever you do, don't bend the cable immediately out of the conduit. That would be asking for trouble.
 
  #9  
Old 12-12-04, 06:57 PM
jhasty
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Q: Installing a new 20Amp outlet in unfinished garage

Another option you might consider that would be a middle of the road solution, is running the circuits in MC. It wouldn't give you the best protection , but would be far more than romex.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
'