Wall Outlets how many

Reply

  #1  
Old 12-18-04, 08:23 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 34
Wall Outlets how many

Hello I`m replace wiring in older home. Was suggested to have lighting and wall plugs on seperate circuits? I have the lighting under control by mapping house and gauging watts. Need suggestions as to Number of outlets per 12-2nmb w Grnd. Also two Bathroom CFCI in each. same ckt or should they be on differant ckt`s thanks Wrenchpuller
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 12-18-04, 08:58 AM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 973
Originally Posted by wrenchpuller0_0
Hello I`m replace wiring in older home. Was suggested to have lighting and wall plugs on seperate circuits? I have the lighting under control by mapping house and gauging watts. Need suggestions as to Number of outlets per 12-2nmb w Grnd. Also two Bathroom CFCI in each. same ckt or should they be on differant ckt`s thanks Wrenchpuller
Separating the lights/outlets is always good so if you trip the breaker with something you plug in you aren't also in the dark. I'm not sure whether code requires that but it is a GOOD idea.

If you are running new circuits in bedrooms, you need to feed them with an Arc Fault Circuit Breaker (these are pricey). For a 20 AMP circuit, I'd personally prefer to stay around 8 outlets, though I don't believe there's an exact rule. I'd like to give each bedroom its own circuit, but there may only be four outlets in a bedroom, so that might be overkill. What you plan on plugging in makes a difference as to how many outlets per circuit. (ie, if you will plug in ceramic heaters, you'll need more circuits, as one of them can use 8-12amps.) I assume you are using 20AMP breakers since you are using 12 gauge wire.

The two bathrooms can be on same circuit, but nothing else should be on that circuit. I believe the bathroom circuit is *required* to be 20AMP (the actual GFCI outlets only have to be 15AMP though). GFCI protection is a must, though you don't have to use a GFCI outlet in each bath if they share the circuit. You can just put a GFCI outlet in as the first outlet, and connect the wires to the second outlet on the "LOAD" terminals of the GFCI outlet. The GFCI outlet will then protect all the "downstream" outlets (sounds like that's just one more outlet). Downside is that tripping the GFCI shuts off all outlet(s). If you do choose to put a GFCI outlet in each bath, don't use the "LOAD" terminals at all. Connect only to the "LINE" terminals, that way each GFCI is only protecting itself. This has the advantage that one bathroom tripping the GFCI does NOT shut off the other outlet(s).


You didn't mention the kitchen, but if you are making changes there it must have two dedicated circuits, each with GFCI protection. Garage/outside outlets also should have GFCI protection, but they can share a circuit. If you have power tools in the garage, add an extra circuit or two for them.

Good luck!
 

Last edited by chirkware; 12-18-04 at 09:04 AM. Reason: Clarification
  #3  
Old 12-19-04, 05:18 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 34
Wall plugs

Thank you confrimed original thoughts . Yea 20 Amp breakers have 3 110 room a/c with dedicated ckt,s only use space heaters on them. Thanks again wrenchpuller
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
'