Position of receptacles

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  #1  
Old 12-20-04, 12:57 PM
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Position of receptacles

I have been in this house for about five years now and have tolerated my receptacle installation just fine. But now I have to ask.
They were all installed with the ground hole up, in my opinion, upside down.
When I was a electrician years ago, we installed them all right side up, that is with the ground hole down. The old timers told me that it needed to be that way to make sure the plug held up nice and tight. They never did refer me to code on it and I have long since left the book behind.
This is never an issue unless I have a heavier than normal transformer type plug (they fall off) or my neighbors who used the same builder complain to me about it.
Now I have to hear some other opinions.
 
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  #2  
Old 12-20-04, 01:15 PM
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It's a safety issue

I don't know if it's code or not. My father in-law recently helped me wire some outlets in my pool room and he instructed me to install them upside down. From many of his how to books, it is so that if the plug comes partially out anything coming in contact with it would hit the ground first. I personally like them right side up. At least if you use this on your neighboor, you might not have to hear them complain anymore. I fell for it until i asked an electrician who informed me that they could be sideways, ****-eyed, or anyway you want them as long as it passes code.
 
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Old 12-20-04, 01:16 PM
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Its my understanding that, technically, what you are *used to* is an upside down outlet. These outlets you are annoyed by *are* "right side up".

They just look ugly that way. Most people like their outlets to look like faces.

I've always thought it made more sense to have the ground at the top, so that if the plug wasn't quite shoved into the recepticle all the way, and something conductive (ie, metal or fingers) fell between the plug and the receptical, it wouldn't short out since it just hits the ground. With the "normal" orientation, my above scenario would be quite shocking as hot/neutral are shorted together!
 
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Old 12-20-04, 01:18 PM
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Originally Posted by GregN
I fell for it until i asked an electrician who informed me that they could be sideways, ****-eyed, or anyway you want them as long as it passes code.
If they are sideways, *I'd* sure want the hot lead on the bottom, not the top, for the same reason you and I both cited.
 
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Old 12-20-04, 01:57 PM
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Prong negates the hazard.

"so that if the plug wasn't quite shoved into the recepticle all the way,"

That's the point the old dudes were telling me. The plug will stay in all the way if it has a nice ground prong to support it.
The "something touching an exposed blade" point sounds like a code thing.
Aesthetics aside, I wonder if code agrees with that good point.
 
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Old 12-20-04, 02:25 PM
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The code does not address this. Do a search on previous posts and you will see the lenghty debates. If the transformer falls out, then by all means, turn the outlets over so it doesn't fall out.
 
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Old 12-20-04, 02:31 PM
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There is no upside down or right side up. They can be installed however you want. Some people install them all one way, except any that are switched so that you can tell what is switched. Some people like them one way, other the other way.

If you have something permanently installed that has a right angle plug, it does make sense to have the receptacle oriented so that the cord drops down.
 
  #8  
Old 12-20-04, 02:37 PM
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I'm not sure I've ever seen a transformer that was polarized. Couldn't you just plug it in "upside down" in the "upside down" (really right side up) outlet?

If it likes to fall out, get a short extension cord, plug it into it, then plug the cord into the wall.

I've always been annoyed by those huge power packs. For a few cents more, they could manufacture them with a 2' cord out of the transformer to plug into the wall, then the slug could sit on the floor. Thankfully, some manufacturers do that.
 
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Old 12-20-04, 03:30 PM
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There is no code on this issue. I have never seen a grounded or polarized wall wart transformer.
It is common practice to install any switched receptacles opposite of the others in the house. Although this is not a code issue either.
 
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Old 12-20-04, 03:40 PM
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I answered a previous post by saying that I too had never seen a polarized transformer. One day later I got a new fire department pager. The charger for that pager has a transformer with a polarized plug. So yes, they do exist.
 
  #11  
Old 12-20-04, 05:28 PM
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Originally Posted by racraft
I answered a previous post by saying that I too had never seen a polarized transformer. One day later I got a new fire department pager. The charger for that pager has a transformer with a polarized plug. So yes, they do exist.

Well, you just one-upped me! I've never seen a pager that had a charger! LOL Mine just uses AA batteries.

Thinking some more, I do remember having a transformer that was grounded. If I recall correctly, it was for the first computer in my family, the good ole TI-99/4A. THAT brings back memories! LOL I also remember that you could keep it from getting loose and falling out of the recepticle by running the plate screw through a little plastic ring on it.
 
  #12  
Old 12-20-04, 05:48 PM
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That's right.

Originally Posted by racraft
The charger for that pager has a transformer with a polarized plug. So yes, they do exist.
Yes they do, making the heavy end point up.
 
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