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How much it would cost to add a new heavy duty computer circuit, by an electrician ?

How much it would cost to add a new heavy duty computer circuit, by an electrician ?

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  #1  
Old 12-23-04, 02:47 PM
sstefano
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How much it would cost to add a new heavy duty computer circuit, by an electrician ?

I know it is very general question but that is for a computer room with four pre-existing outlest and one new outlet. Access is reasonable from the basement. This is where the circuit breaker is located too.

thanks,
Spyros.
 
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  #2  
Old 12-23-04, 03:29 PM
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It all depends on how difficult it will be to run the wires. Figure a couple of hours and some materials.

By the way. Don't use the term heavy duty computer circuit. If you use a term like that it makes you look ignorant, and an electrician may take advantage of you. All you need is a standard 20 amp circuit. There will be nothing heavy duty about the circuit in any way.
 
  #3  
Old 12-29-04, 08:09 AM
cthsrichard
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If sstefano really wants "heavy duty", meaning more more than a single 20 amp circuit, why not have the electrician pull wires for two (or even four) 20 amp circuits? I'm assuming he has room in his panel. The labor and cost of materials should not be that much higher - in relation to how much more he would be getting. Most modern kitchen counters (work areas) have such a set up.
 
  #4  
Old 12-29-04, 03:56 PM
sstefano
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Originally Posted by racraft
It all depends on how difficult it will be to run the wires. Figure a couple of hours and some materials.

By the way. Don't use the term heavy duty computer circuit. If you use a term like that it makes you look ignorant, and an electrician may take advantage of you. All you need is a standard 20 amp circuit. There will be nothing heavy duty about the circuit in any way.
Yeah, heavy duty is not the right term and the electrician may have tried to take advantage of me. Allo I need is one 20 Amp circuit. She asked $1500 for rewiring 3 old receptables plus one new. The sockets are accessible from the basement although a little hidden it should not be very time consuming to reach them becuase they a couple of inches from the floor. So figure four hours times 125 plus 150 for materials makes 700, right ?
 
  #5  
Old 12-29-04, 04:05 PM
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I'll come there and pop in a 20 amp ckt w/one recep for ya for $700....but then no, I wouldn't do that to anyone....

jm2c
 
  #6  
Old 12-30-04, 04:42 AM
sgent
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When you said "heavy duty" I was thinking of a different option...

Rackmounts, which are are large towers with up to 42 computers installed, often have a UPS (which powers the computers) with inputs of 240v/30amp or higher. This was my thinking on heavy duty.

It is used in server closests with lots of power needed, but probably isn't what you are looking for.
 
  #7  
Old 12-30-04, 06:38 AM
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Unless you have a rack or a large server with several 21" monitors there is no need to run anything larger then a 20A circuit. If you have a laser printer, especially color, you may want to run a dedicated circuit for that printer. They tend to use a lot of power, and cause fairly significant voltage drop while starting the print job. I've had one case where the breaker (15A) would trip every time they would try to print.

If you really want to spend the money run a 20A circuit for every computer that you'll have.
 
  #8  
Old 12-30-04, 09:07 AM
sstefano
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Originally Posted by trinitro
Unless you have a rack or a large server with several 21" monitors there is no need to run anything larger then a 20A circuit. If you have a laser printer, especially color, you may want to run a dedicated circuit for that printer. They tend to use a lot of power, and cause fairly significant voltage drop while starting the print job. I've had one case where the breaker (15A) would trip every time they would try to print.

If you really want to spend the money run a 20A circuit for every computer that you'll have.
No I think heavy duty is the wrong term, I am new homeowner of a very old house and I am learning a lot for a number of things that were reasonable in my humble rentals.
At this point there is one huge circuit running through a good part of the house so when I turn on the TV everything blinks. So I quickly need one 20A dedicated circuit running in the office in one new and two or three old outlets. It stroke me as very expensive to spend 1400$ just for that, this is why I investigated here. I am going to get a second quote and if that is too high I will try to do it myself although I am short on time ...

thanks for your comments so far - any additional advice comments welcome ...
 
  #9  
Old 12-30-04, 09:10 AM
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If the basement is unfinished, you have a single level home and the panel is in the basement you could run a new circuit in as little as 1 hour. What's important for a computer circuit is a proper ground, surge protectors are almost useless if a proper ground is not avaialble.
How old is the main panel, and how large is the main breaker?
 
  #10  
Old 12-30-04, 10:18 AM
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Get 3 quotes and look for an electrician that will let you do some of the work yourself (running the wire) to save on his/her expensive time. If you need a lot of work done, try to get it all done at once to make it more worth the electrician's time.

Doug M.
 
  #11  
Old 12-30-04, 12:29 PM
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What type of receptacles and what type of wire is used to wire the "old" receptacles that you want rewired on the new circuit? If the receptacles are 3-wire, wired with 12/2 with ground, and if they are daisy chained with the wire running under the floor, then you could simply isolate them with some new wiring under the house and a new wire back to the panel.

But $1500 - you should report them to the BBB unless there's something you're not telling us.
 
  #12  
Old 12-30-04, 01:37 PM
sstefano
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Originally Posted by mcjunk
What type of receptacles and what type of wire is used to wire the "old" receptacles that you want rewired on the new circuit? If the receptacles are 3-wire, wired with 12/2 with ground, and if they are daisy chained with the wire running under the floor, then you could simply isolate them with some new wiring under the house and a new wire back to the panel.

But $1500 - you should report them to the BBB unless there's something you're not telling us.
They do need new wire 12/2 - At least one receptable does not have the grounding wire so isolating is not an option for this room, I do not know about the other ones. The receptacles are relatively accessible from the basement, only the last part of the wire tube is missing when it cross the floor and goes to the the receptacles which are two inces from the floor.
I do not know if I am missing something big, the only way to know is to get one or two more quotes.

Spyros.
 
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