Circuits keep blowing???

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  #1  
Old 12-29-04, 07:32 AM
LAL426
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Circuits keep blowing???

Hello:
This is my first post here. I had my home build a year ago. It is a 3100 square foot colonial with 200 amp service. Recently we have blown the same fuse in the house about four times. This fuse is connected to the microwave and other kitchen lights. Last night when it blew (two times) the microwave was on both times. I am not sure if the mircowave was on the two other times that it happened over the last few weeks. Any idea what is causing this to occur and how to rectify the problem? I know that there have been several times over the last year when the microwave was running with all of the other lights on and the fuse has not blown on those occasions - this just started happening a few weeks ago. Any assistance is much appreciated. LAL
 
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  #2  
Old 12-29-04, 07:48 AM
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If I was there I would measure the current draw on that circuit. Perhaps something else is plugged in that circuit that only runs now.

I'm sure you don't have fuses on a 2003 house, I'm sure they are breakers.

You can try replacing the breaker, but I don't think that's the problem.
Find out everything that's on that circuit.
 
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Old 12-29-04, 07:57 AM
LAL426
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You are right about them being breakers and not fuses (not too up on my electrical terms). I checked and the microwave, range hood, two ceiling lights and a strand of outside Christmas lights all run on that circuit. Could it be happening due to the Christmas lights being plugged into the outside outlet which runs on this circuit? I would not think that one strand of outside lights would suck up that much electricity. Thanks for any help!
 
  #4  
Old 12-29-04, 08:01 AM
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What size is the breaker? If 20A then the available "power" is 120Vx20A. You can then add the wattage of everything in that circuit and see how close you are to 2400W (actually 80% of that).
 
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Old 12-29-04, 08:45 AM
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For a houise just built in 03 there seem to be items that do not follow the National Electrical Code. Check with a local building department to see if your area enforces this.

The NEC requirements for kitchens are for at least 2 20 amp small appliance circuits. With a minor exception they should only feed the kitchen and dining room receptacles, ie no lighting, range hood or outside receptacles.

Sounds like you may need to address this with your builder.
 
  #6  
Old 12-29-04, 10:01 AM
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IF this house was vuilt a year ago and the microwave is on the same circuit as lights, then you have a problem. I would call back the elctrician who wired the bhouse and point out that he did an inferior job, possibly against code. Now I wouldn;t use those words, but you get the idea.
 
  #7  
Old 12-29-04, 10:20 AM
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Code or no code, there's too much on this circuit. A modern microwave alone will run nearly the capacity of a 15 amp breaker. Add the lights and you're pushing it. Add the Christmas lights and you're over the limit. Yes, some types of Christmas lights use 7 watts per bulb. A couple hundred watts by the time you add them all up. If this is a portable microwave (there's definately a code violation here...) try moving it to a different plug.

Doug M.
 
  #8  
Old 12-29-04, 11:12 AM
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Originally Posted by LAL426
You are right about them being breakers and not fuses (not too up on my electrical terms). I checked and the microwave, range hood, two ceiling lights and a strand of outside Christmas lights all run on that circuit. Could it be happening due to the Christmas lights being plugged into the outside outlet which runs on this circuit? I would not think that one strand of outside lights would suck up that much electricity. Thanks for any help!
one way to find out. Unplug the christmas lights and see if the breaker trips when the microwave is operating.

where is the micowave located?
 
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Old 12-29-04, 05:27 PM
LAL426
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I have never had this issue until using the outside outlet for the christmas lights so the circuit will not blow if the lights are not on. And it rarely blows with the christmas lights on and the mircowave on. The circuit that the microwave is connected to also controls the range hood and outside outlets. It appears as though everything else in the kitchen (refridg, oven, dishwasher, ect) has its own dedicated circuit. So is there an issue with the microwave being on the same circuit as the outside outlet and range hood? If so, does this present any dangerous type of situations (fire, ect)? The builder has since retired and I do not think that I could get in touch with him. Also, the microwave is inside a shelf built into the cabinet specifically for it so moving the microwave would be likely be out of the question. Thanks for the help!
 
  #10  
Old 12-30-04, 08:58 AM
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What size circuit breaker supplies the microwave, etc? 20 amp? 15 amp?
 
  #11  
Old 12-30-04, 09:20 AM
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Almost has to be a 20 amp. Is the plug actually above a counter top? Is there a GFCI that protects the outside plug?

Doug M.
 
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