Switch/outlet problem


  #1  
Old 12-29-04, 03:37 PM
rgill
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Question Switch problem

Box with a switch to a overhead light and an outlet.
Stopped working. Replaced with new switch and receptical.
Measure voltage get 125v coming in to both the switch and
plug but on the outside of the plug get 40 vac. I am stumped.
Thanks in Advance,
-Rick
 
  #2  
Old 12-29-04, 03:50 PM
rgill
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Switch/outlet problem

I have an outlet box with a switch for two overhead lights
and a two plug recepticle. I replaced both when neither
seemed to work. Measured 120v coming in so knew there
was power to the box. Measured 40v on the plug and
the switch. I am stumped.
 
  #3  
Old 12-29-04, 07:09 PM
R
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How are you measuring for voltage? Where are you measuring and what are you using? What do you mean "40 volts on the outside"?
 
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Old 12-29-04, 09:44 PM
rgill
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Originally Posted by racraft
How are you measuring for voltage? Where are you measuring and what are you using? What do you mean "40 volts on the outside"?
VOM, measuring by plugging into the outlet where I get 40vac.
Getting 120 across the white/black going into the plug and into
the switch.
 
  #5  
Old 12-30-04, 05:23 AM
R
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If you are using a digital voltmeter, then put it away. Do not use a digital voltmeter for this application.

Measuring 40 volts implies an open wire. It could be an open neutral or an open hot.

Measure voltage (using an analog meter) between the black wire and the white wire, between the black wire and the ground wire, and finally between the white wire and the ground wire.

And please tell me what you mean by "on the outside".
 
  #6  
Old 12-30-04, 11:00 AM
rgill
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Originally Posted by racraft
If you are using a digital voltmeter, then put it away. Do not use a digital voltmeter for this application.

Measuring 40 volts implies an open wire. It could be an open neutral or an open hot.

Measure voltage (using an analog meter) between the black wire and the white wire, between the black wire and the ground wire, and finally between the white wire and the ground wire.

And please tell me what you mean by "on the outside".
Thanks for the time
Took the switch and plug off and measured with an analog meter
Blk-Common 125v
Wh Common 0
Blk Wh 15 (Fifteen) v (That I thought was really odd.
-Rick
 
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Old 12-30-04, 01:32 PM
R
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Originally Posted by rgill
Thanks for the time
Took the switch and plug off and measured with an analog meter
Blk-Common 125v
Wh Common 0
Blk Wh 15 (Fifteen) v (That I thought was really odd.
-Rick
Your post does not make sense.

You should have a black wire, a white wire and a bare (or green) ground wire. What do you mean by common?
 
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Old 12-30-04, 02:25 PM
rgill
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replace common with bare copper.
Black bare copper 125vac
Wht copper 0
blk white 15 vac.
 
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Old 12-30-04, 02:59 PM
J
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replace common with bare copper
I have no idea what this means, but it sounds really, really bad.
 
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Old 12-30-04, 04:09 PM
R
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You have an open neutral. The white wire is disconnected somewhere.

An open neutral is a common problem. If you caused the problem with your switch/receptacle replacement then you messed something up.

If this happened on it's own then a white wire has become disconnected. You need to trace back through the circuit until you find the location where the white wire is not making proper contact. It may be at the last location with power, or it may be at the first location without power. Find it, and reconnect the white (neutral) wire.
 
  #11  
Old 12-30-04, 04:18 PM
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John, I think, hope, he means replace the word "common" with the words "bare copper" in the previous post. If not, there will either be a new thread starting any minute now or a call to 911...

Doug M.
 
 

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