220 vs. 110

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  #1  
Old 01-13-05, 02:38 PM
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220 vs. 110

maybe yous guys could answer this.my pond pump is 110 volts and 3.2 amps.it can be wired for 220 also.is it true that 220 uses half the amps,and basically cost half the electrical charge.
if this is the case it might pay for me to have an electrican run a 220 line outside for me.in ny the electric rates are murder and the fish need a large pump to circulate the water.
i have been asking for a lot of different ways of redoing my outside electric,cause i want to explore all my possibilites and either i do it or have an electrician do it,and do it once and do it right,so i really appreciate all the help and info,all of you have given me.
 

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  #2  
Old 01-13-05, 02:47 PM
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Nope. You use the same amount of electricity. You don't really save any money by going the 220V route.

220X1.6 = 110X3.2

On larger applicances you do save some materials money as the conductors don't have to be as large. But in your case you can run the same 14-2 wire and run the pump either at 110V or 220V. If however you need a GCFI protected circuit you should probably stay with 110V as double pole GCFI breakers are expensive.
 
  #3  
Old 01-13-05, 04:55 PM
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Originally Posted by trinitro
Nope. You use the same amount of electricity. You don't really save any money by going the 220V route.

220X1.6 = 110X3.2

On larger applicances you do save some materials money as the conductors don't have to be as large. But in your case you can run the same 14-2 wire and run the pump either at 110V or 220V. If however you need a GCFI protected circuit you should probably stay with 110V as double pole GCFI breakers are expensive.

Trinitro.... In the state of Florida, all electrical use is measured by amperage used. I thought this was how it was done everywhere. So, being that E (voltage) and I (Amperage) are directly proportional than if you use a higher voltage, the amperage will be less than at the lower voltage.
So if I use 220 V for a pump, it will cost me half as much to run it than at 110 V.
 
  #4  
Old 01-13-05, 04:58 PM
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You are billed for watts used.
Watts = volts x amps. The watts are the same. Twice the votls 1/2 amps.
 
  #5  
Old 01-13-05, 05:02 PM
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Originally Posted by JerryB52
So if I use 220 V for a pump, it will cost me half as much to run it than at 110 V.
Jerry, I am surprised to hear this from an electrician.

Yes, it will cost half as much, but on two legs. So it's 100% x 1 or 50% x 2. Same outcome.
 
  #6  
Old 01-13-05, 06:28 PM
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I've been duped.... From working with 277v lighting for over 15 years and was told that the higher voltage saved money...

Also was told that the meter read amperage and never questioned it.
 
  #7  
Old 01-13-05, 07:00 PM
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It does save money, but not in the usage.
You can put 2.3 times more lights on a 277 volt circuit than a 120 so you save in wiring and circuits run.
 
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