Power Supply Repair: Capacitor Question

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  #1  
Old 01-13-05, 04:28 PM
Richard D
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Question Power Supply Repair: Capacitor Question

Hi. I am new to the forum but had a quick question. My JVC VCR went dead and I opened it up and saw a fuse blown and a capacitor leaking some brown stuff. I checked the cap with a multimeter and it registered out of range or an open cap. All other caps had a reading, so I think it's safe to assume the cap is bad.

I live in Houston. The capacitor is a 3300 uf 16 V. I called some stores like radio shack and others, but only a VCR repair store had it for $17.00. I looked at my spare parts and noticed I have an unused 3300 uf 25 V capacitor. Can I use the 25 V cap in place of the 16V one? Also is there polarity on the capacitor? I don't want to invest too much money on the VCR as new ones are so cheap and are becoming obsolete. Any help would be apreciated.

Any other stores that carry parts cheaper?
 
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  #2  
Old 01-13-05, 04:41 PM
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Always remember that Google is your friend.

I have no clue about capacitors, but through Google I found a web page with the 3300 uf 16 v for a couple of bucks. (I searched for "3300 uf 16 v" and put quotes around it to only give me the exact phrase.) Here you go:

http://www.kiesub.com/capacitors.htm

I'd say you can find whatever else you want there as well...
 
  #3  
Old 01-13-05, 04:44 PM
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A Higher capacitor voltage rating will work fine.

I am assuming this is a ceramic or mica type capacitor, I have never seen one leak, burst yes.

If the component is polarized there should be a (+) positive at one of the leads. Most polarized capacitors are electrolytic which is indicative of it's foil finish.

Good luck.
 
  #4  
Old 01-13-05, 05:37 PM
Richard D
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Thanks for the replies!
chirk, I was trying to avoid waiting a few days and shipping costs, but it looks like the repair shop guy was going to gouge me for a huge profit. But even with shipping it would be cheaper, so thanks! I was just hoping for the name of an electronics store that sells stuff like this. I guess I should google it and use Houston. There should be some places I would think in a city this size.

Upnrunning. The capacitor is an aluminum electrolytic. Like you said it has a foil finish wrapped in a casing designating its rating. I looked around the other caps in the power supply and none had that brown stuff on the circuit board. It came from either the cap or maybe the glue, so I don't know, just saw something different around that cap, and after seeing it is open, came to that conclusion.

Upon further inspection I see on the cap that there is a string of ( - ) going down the side of a lead indicating polarity. That would be important unless I want to see it blow up! My bad. Thanks for the direction and for confirming the higher voltage rating would work okay.

I'll give it a shot.
 
  #5  
Old 01-13-05, 10:48 PM
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Too late for my advice you scavenge a capacitor out of any old dead, free VCR.
 
  #6  
Old 01-14-05, 08:07 AM
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This sounds like the output cap on the power supply. I would replace all of the output caps, not only the failed one. If any of them look like they bulged a little they should be replaced also.

Based on the CV it sounds like a snap-in type capacitor. You can always go up in voltage, never down. For an output cap you can also go up in capacitance, the more capacitance the better the singnal will be filtered.

I know Radio Shack has this cap. Most distribuitors will have something similar also.

This is from somebody that works with electrolytic caps all day long..
 
  #7  
Old 01-14-05, 10:45 AM
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Try it...if it don't work...spend the $40 or so for a new one.
 
  #8  
Old 01-14-05, 11:07 AM
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Just remember that the capacitor may not be the root cause of the problem - it may be a victim of whatever caused the fuse to blow.

VCRs (and DVD players for that matter) are dirt cheap right these days, unless yours is something special (S-VHS) I wouldn't spend too much trying to fix it. Unless you are trying to learn something in the process....
 
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