Baseboard Heating to GE Zoneline Heat Pump

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  #1  
Old 01-13-05, 10:46 PM
TheRhino
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Baseboard Heating to GE Zoneline Heat Pump

I am hoping to install a GE Zoneline AC/Heat pump through the wall in place of the current electric baseboard heater in a 30year old house

The heater is connected to a double pole 40AMP breaker that feeds only 3 wires. Is this an old way of wiring (sharing netural and ground on the same wire)? Will it still server the purpose of hooking up the new heat pump using the same 2 hot wires and the one return? What does the code say about this?
 
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Old 01-13-05, 11:01 PM
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The 240 volt heater doesn't use a neutral, or need one, so long as both wires are on different legs at the panel. That's normal today as it was 30 years ago. The third, ground wire, isn't part of the circuit unless something goes wrong.

Does the GE Zoneline AC/Heat pump need 4 wires?
 
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Old 01-14-05, 08:14 AM
TheRhino
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I don't have the zoneline yet, I'm trying to get the gameplan together.

I must not understand circuits fully. I thought when you ran a double pole breaker from a subpanel then you needed to use 3wire (plus ground). Single pole just required 2wire

Why wouldn't the 240V circuit need a neutral wire?
 
  #4  
Old 01-14-05, 08:27 AM
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All circuits, no matter what the voltage, need only two wires, one to carry the electrons out and one to carry them back. Appliances such as space heaters, water heaters, compressors, and welders are typically pure 240-volt appliances and need only two wires (plus a grounding wire which carries no current and plays no role except in the event of a fault).

What cause a lot of confusion is the existence of other appliances, such as many cooking appliances and almost all clothes dryers, which have both 240-volt and 120-volt components. These appliances are really two circuits in one, a 240-volt circuit and a 120-volt circuit. The 240-volt circuit uses the two hot wires, and the 120-volt circuit uses one of the hot wires and the neutral. On a clothes dryer, the drum and controls run off 120 volts, and the heating element runs off 240 volts.
 
  #5  
Old 01-15-05, 02:41 AM
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Why wouldn't the 240V circuit need a neutral wire?

Because either line is only hot intermittently - alternating current - when the other one isn't. So whichever happens to be hot during that split-second uses the other as neutral. That's why it's essential 240 volt circuits connect to separate bars in the panel (with most panels the zipper configuration of the bars ensures that).
 
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