120v 20amp Treadmill Need Help

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  #1  
Old 01-14-05, 03:02 AM
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120v 20amp Treadmill Need Help

Hi I bought a used treadmill so I have no manual. It's a heavy duty quinton treadmill. 3 hp elec. motor(commercial grade). I have some questions.

1.The plug coming off the treadmill isn't like a normal plug. It's normal other than the left prong, instead of vertical is horizontal. Why is it like this?

2.On the treadmill it has a metal plate that says v 120 A 20. So I assume it's needs a 120 volts and 20 amp circuit breaker. Is this correct?

3.What size wire should I run? The treadmill is 50 feet away from the breaker box. I looked at an online calculator and it suggested 10/2 which is what I was figuring on but should I go with something heavier gauge? Do they make a 8/2 wire? I want to make sure it doesn't run out of juice.


4.I plan on running 10/2 wire off a single 20 amp dedicated circuit breaker to get 120 volts. Is this sufficent/

5.Is it possable to run 220 volt of a dedicated 20 amp circuit breaker to the treadmill, even though the treadmill is 120v? Will this cause problems it still will have a 20 amp breaker. Like I said I just want to make sure it has enough juice.
 
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  #2  
Old 01-14-05, 05:50 AM
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1. This is a 20 amp plug. It is designed for a 20 amp receptacle.

2. Yes.

3,4. You could certainly use 10/2 wire if you want. Keep in mind that 10/2 may not connect to a receptacle, so you may need to pigtail small pieces of 12 gauge wire to connect to the receptacle. 8/2 would be overkill, but yes they do make it. I recommend a brand new circuit, as you propose, and then using a single 20 amp receptacle (not a duplex).

5. Your question does not make sense. The treadmill needs 120 volts. Running 240 volts to it won't get you anywhere.

If the company that made the treadmill is still in business, you can probably get a manual by calling them or sending them an email, or even by downloading it across the Internet. You really should get a manual.
 
  #3  
Old 01-14-05, 06:33 AM
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Originally Posted by racraft
Keep in mind that 10/2 may not connect to a receptacle, so you may need to pigtail small pieces of 12 gauge wire to connect to the receptacle.
A commercial grade 20A receptacle should take 10/2 with no problems. Look for a backwire (not backstab) receptacle, the ones I have used were labeled for #10 wire.
Originally Posted by racraft
Running 240 volts to it won't get you anywhere.
Using a treadmill at all won't get you anywhere - all that running and you're still where you started .

Connecting 240 to a 120 treadmill will let all the smoke out of the treadmill, and everyone know that once the smoke gets out it won't work anymore .
 
  #4  
Old 01-14-05, 06:50 AM
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Originally Posted by mikewu99
A commercial grade 20A receptacle should take 10/2 with no problems. Look for a backwire (not backstab) receptacle, the ones I have used were labeled for #10 wire.
Not to change the subject, but doesn't the code not allow backstabbing anything larger than 14 gauge?
 
  #5  
Old 01-14-05, 08:39 AM
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I said backwire, not backstab. A backwire receptacle has holes in the back to insert the wires and a screw-driven plate to clamp the wires in place.
 
  #6  
Old 01-14-05, 09:45 AM
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Yes, Blizzard, you are correct (even though it doesn't apply to anything in this thread). Backstabbing is not allowed on anything larger than #14. But I don't think that's a code restriction--it's a UL restriction.
 
  #7  
Old 01-14-05, 10:17 AM
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Originally Posted by mikewu99
I said backwire, not backstab. A backwire receptacle has holes in the back to insert the wires and a screw-driven plate to clamp the wires in place.
Sorry, I didn't mean to make it sound like you did, I was just inferring that he shouldn't even be able to find a 20A outlet that could be backstabbed.
 
  #8  
Old 01-14-05, 01:00 PM
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Ok so backstab an 8/2 wire into a duplex receptacle @240v.

Seriously man you guys are quick with very good info. Thanks so much!!!

So 10/2 into a single backwire receptacle made for a 10/2 wire.

Another question. When wiring up the receptacle which end should have the black, and which the white, when refering to the horizontal and vertical opening in the receptical?
 
  #9  
Old 01-14-05, 02:52 PM
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The white wire should go to the horizontal slot, and the the black wire to the vertical slot. But you don't need to know that because screw color is your guide: black to brass, white to silver.
 
  #10  
Old 01-21-05, 01:44 PM
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I still haven't had a chance to do this job. I wanted to say thanks for the help guys.

Another question I picked up 10/2 wire at home depot and the guy at HD said I was basicly going to burn my house down running 10/2 in this application as opposed to 12/2 which he told me to get.

Is there any problems using 10/2 on a 20 amp breaker and 10amp receptacle??
 
  #11  
Old 01-21-05, 01:51 PM
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Was the HD guy was sober? Ignore this gibberish.
 
  #12  
Old 01-21-05, 02:45 PM
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HeHe lol

Yeah that's what I did and bought it, he just had me second guessing.

Thanks!!!
 
  #13  
Old 01-22-05, 08:50 AM
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Why 10 Ga.

I have a question about the 10 gauge wire. Couldn't this circuit safely use 12 gauge? My understanding is that 12 gauge can handle up to 20 amp's. I know that 10 ga. is safer, but I doubt that the treadmill is pulling 20 amps except at startup. I am going to be in a similar situation soon, so I am not just shooting the breeze here.
 
  #14  
Old 01-22-05, 12:31 PM
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999 people out of 1000 will use #12 on a 20-amp circuit. 0100 is the other guy. All are correct.
 
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