GCFI question(s)

Reply

  #1  
Old 01-24-05, 09:52 AM
Jooced
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
GCFI question(s)

Our house was just finished late 2004 and we're currently finishing the basement. We've reached the electrical portion of the job but I found something that I thought was odd and thought maybe experience could answer the question or at least point me in the right direction.

In the unfinished part of the basement the electrician who did the original wiring on the house did a nice and ran two runs to where the future bathroom would be.

One run is a 12/2 and on a 20 amp circuit labeled "Bath GCFI". Makes sense to me. This run is not hooked up, simply terminated in the outlet box. It is connected to the other bathrooms as well which all work like it should. The second run is on 14/2 and is on a 15a breaker labeled "GCFI" and ends in the same box but is connected to the working outlet. I'm not sure where else it goes since I'm unable to trace it into the walls.

Here are my questions. I'm assuming that this is a GCFI run because any unfinished area in the house has to be GCFI, correct?

I was under the impression that any GCFI had to be on a 12/2 run (20 amp). Am I wrong for thinking that? Does that only apply to bath/kitchen areas?

What else would a 15a 14/2 GCFI run be used for in the house (in an attempt to track down where else it goes without running around testing outlets after shutting off the breaker)? Thanks for your time one these questions.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 01-24-05, 10:38 AM
Member
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: North Virginia
Posts: 192
Originally Posted by Jooced
What else would a 15a 14/2 GCFI run be used for in the house (in an attempt to track down where else it goes without running around testing outlets after shutting off the breaker)? Thanks for your time one these questions.
Just a guess, but it might be tied to the GCFI breaker for the garage or the outside receptacles.
 
  #3  
Old 01-24-05, 10:40 AM
Jooced
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
/slaps forehead

Not sure why I didn't think of that by now. It explains why trying to trace the wires leads to a few dead ends (aka outside....).
 
  #4  
Old 01-24-05, 11:16 AM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: United States
Posts: 18,497
I'm assuming that this is a GCFI run because any unfinished area in the house has to be GCFI, correct?
Yes, correct. Receptacles in unfinished parts of the basement need to be GFCI.

I was under the impression that any GCFI had to be on a 12/2 run (20 amp). Am I wrong for thinking that?
Yes, you are wrong for thinking that.

Does that only apply to bath/kitchen areas?
Not only to bath and kitchen, but it does apply to bath and kitchen.
 
  #5  
Old 01-24-05, 12:11 PM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: SC
Posts: 171
The circuit for the bath must be 20A. The 15A would just be a general purpose recep.
 
  #6  
Old 01-24-05, 02:46 PM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Central New York State
Posts: 13,973
(in an attempt to track down where else it goes without running around testing outlets after shutting off the breaker)


If you do not know what breaker each and every light, receptacles and appliance is on then you need to figure this out. You should be able to tell by looking at your panel (and a chart that you make) what each and every circuit breaker controls and what circuit breaker controls each and every electrical device, receptacle and light in the house.

Shame on you if you did not do this after moving in. You should have. The information may save your life some day. Do this now. Consider it part of your basement project.
 
  #7  
Old 01-24-05, 04:17 PM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 973
Originally Posted by racraft
If you do not know what breaker each and every light, receptacles and appliance is on then you need to figure this out. You should be able to tell by looking at your panel (and a chart that you make) what each and every circuit breaker controls and what circuit breaker controls each and every electrical device, receptacle and light in the house.



I agree with Bob on this. I did this for my house a few months back as the first step before electrical work for my remodel got started. I worked by myself, walking back and forth from the panel box (which is outside) to various outlets/lights/appliances. I thought it would take all day, but I got it done in just a few hours. A helper would make it MUCH faster. You'll find this to be time WELL spent as you'll never have to go back and forth trying different breakers again. Of course, no matter how confident you are in the diagram you create, you must STILL test the wires to verify they are dead before commencing work.
 
  #8  
Old 01-25-05, 06:24 AM
Jooced
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Thanks for the advice guys. My question pretty much came from doing this type of 'what goes where' project. I had figured out everything BUT those two runs which now make complete sense. I live in Minnesota and haven't been around the outside of the house since the original walk through due to snow and the fact that well.... it's cold. The outside outlets totally spaced my mind because of this but certainly explain the non-bath GCFI run which the unfinished basement outlets use.

Thank god I figured it out - I think if the wife had to run around resetting clocks again I was going to get it.
 
  #9  
Old 01-25-05, 06:27 AM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 973
Originally Posted by Jooced
I think if the wife had to run around resetting clocks again I was going to get it.

Worse yet, you cut power to the computer she is using at the time, or to the VCR that is recording her favorite show!
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
'