Breaker size for dedicated 15A 220V outlet

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Old 01-29-05, 08:35 AM
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Breaker size for dedicated 15A 220V outlet

I understand that if a 110V circuit feeds a dedicated, simplex outlet, that outlet MUST be rated at the same amperage as the breaker. IE, if its a 20A breaker, the simplex outlet must be 20A.

Does the same apply to 220V?

I plan to install a dedicated 15A 220V outlet to run my Radial Arm Saw (11.0A @ 110V, 5.5A @ 220V). I am guessing that I must use a 15A, 220V breaker to feed this outlet. Is that true? Since this is a dedicated outlet, there is no requirement for GFCI protection, despite the fact it is in the garage, correct?


If I wanted to be able to use a 20A 220V breaker, could I simply install two 15A 220V outlets, making this circuit no longer be dedicated? (Just like 15A 110V outlets are OK on 20A 110V circuit so long as there is more than one outlet.) I'm guessing I can. However, I'm also guessing that turns this into a general purpose circuit and, since it is in my garage, I then have to use a GFCI breaker.

I plan to run 12-2wg regardless of which size breaker I use. The subpanel this will be fed by will be within 20ft...

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Old 01-29-05, 08:45 AM
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Yes, the same rule applies to 220. If the 15-amp receptacle is the only one on the circuit, it must be a 15-amp breaker.

Correct, your 240-volt receptacle need not be GFCI protected even though it is in the garage.

Yes, you could install two 15-amp receptacles and use a 20-amp breaker. And no, you still don't need GFCI.
 
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Old 01-29-05, 09:08 AM
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Originally Posted by John Nelson
Yes, you could install two 15-amp receptacles and use a 20-amp breaker. And no, you still don't need GFCI.

Thanks John,

That's probably the route I'll go, as I have some spare 20A 220V breakers and plenty of wire. A second 15A 220V recepticle is probably cheaper than a 15A 220V breaker anyway. This also gives me the flexibility of having a second location for the RAS. I suppose I could also locate the second recepticle where I could use it for a 220V heater (which I would turn off before operating the dust-producing RAS).

I'm glad to hear they don't need GFCI protection. Is GFCI on 220V just required for things like spas, pools, etc. where water is around?


BTW: After I moved in to this house, I found that someone had ran a 10-2wg romex to a 15A 220V recepticle by feeding it from the 30A 220V recepticle for the dryer, which was fed by 10-3 (no ground). In doing so, they "converted" the neutral at the dryer recepticle to a ground for the 15A recepticle. Black to Black, Red to Red, White to Bare Nice, huh? Getting rid of that recepticle was the first electrical project at this house.
 
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