Sub's

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  #1  
Old 01-29-05, 03:48 PM
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Sub's

Can you run two sub panel in "series" on "one set # 2 wire" (100 amp), 45 ft if so do you go from lug (1st sub)to lug(2nd sub) or would you go from 100 amp breaker on 1st sub to second sub?? If not what would be the best way to wire??

John1
 
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  #2  
Old 01-29-05, 05:43 PM
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The problem with your first approach is that most lugs are not rated for two conductors. But if you can find some that are, you can do it. Or you can certainly run the second sub from a breaker in the first sub. Either way, of course, you can only get 100 amps from the two panels combined.
 
  #3  
Old 01-29-05, 06:25 PM
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Johh Nelson

Same question again

Is that 100 amps of all which is "running" at one time or all which is" connected".

In other words/ for example: can one have say 250 amps of breakers in 1 main and 2 sub panels on a 200 amp service as long as you don't have more than 200 amps being drawn at one time from all panels total?

The main is a 200 amp service.

I have numerous shop equipment pieces however only one or two pieces will be running at "any given time" and never exceeding probably 100 amps total.

Just want two subs for reasons discussed in earlier post (wire savings etc

For some reason this keeps throwing me off..

I apologize to be so redundant!!



John1
 
  #4  
Old 01-29-05, 06:41 PM
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It's 100 amps running. The sum of the breakers is meaningless. I don't care if you put 2000 amps of breakers in each of all three panels.
 
  #5  
Old 01-29-05, 06:48 PM
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John Nelson

Thanks John that answers my question, for some reason I just didn't get it.

I just always thought for insurance/code reasons the total number of breakers/connections could not exceed the service total but now I know it is you can not exceed the service total ""running at one time "".

Thanks again!

John1
 

Last edited by John1; 01-29-05 at 07:00 PM.
  #6  
Old 01-29-05, 07:26 PM
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There is something called a "demand load calculation". Google on that term and you can learn about it. It's a bit complicated, so devote some time to study it. The key factors are the square footage of your house and whether your major systems are gas or electric.
 
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