What is proper wiring for double outlets

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  #1  
Old 02-03-05, 01:36 PM
Shadowman
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What is proper wiring for double outlets

I want to put in a double gang box, two sets of outlets. What's the proper way to wire these? (for simplicity I'm only talking about 1 wire in my example)

A. Maret the incoming and outgoing wire with 2 short wires that each attach to an outlet.

B. Incoming to outlet 1, short wire from second screw to other outlet, outgoing wire to second screw on outlet 2.

I realize option A works but I'm working with #12 wire and already had a horrible experience trying to maret 4 #12's together. A royal pain to get them to stay (technique hints anyone?). Option B would be simple but possibly against code?

Thanks
 
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  #2  
Old 02-03-05, 01:58 PM
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As long as we aren't talking about a multiwire circuit, option B is within code and perfectly acceptable.
 
  #3  
Old 02-03-05, 08:54 PM
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To add....connecting 4 #12's is normally pretty tough for the person who only does this ocassionally. If the fourth wire is a pigtail it is even harder. I may get some difference of opinion but Ideal is making a push in connector that makes this very easy for the DIYer. You can find it a Home Depot or electrical suppy shop. This connector is advertized to not have the problems of a related connection called the backstab. Here is a link to a image of one.

http://www.goodmart.com/products/228694.htm
 
  #4  
Old 02-04-05, 06:09 AM
Shadowman
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Thanks both. I don't think it's a multiwire circuit, just going to be one run of 12/2 for a bunch of outlets.
 
  #5  
Old 02-04-05, 09:17 AM
mb32
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I have a question.
In Shadowman's example A, If these are 15amp receptacles could the pigtails be #14 wire?
 
  #6  
Old 02-04-05, 09:25 AM
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"In Shadowman's example A, If these are 15amp receptacles could the pigtails be #14 wire?"

Only if the circuit overcurrent protection does not exceed 15 amperes.
 
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Old 02-04-05, 09:28 AM
mb32
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nevermind.
I wasn't thinking. duplex receptacles are 15 amp each.
sorry
 
  #8  
Old 02-04-05, 09:39 AM
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15 amp receptacles are aloowed on a 20 amp branch circuit.

20 amp receptacles are not allowed on 15 amp branch circuit
 
  #9  
Old 02-04-05, 11:39 AM
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Originally Posted by Roger
I may get some difference of opinion but Ideal is making a push in connector that makes this very easy for the DIYer. You can find it a Home Depot or electrical suppy shop. This connector is advertized to not have the problems of a related connection called the backstab. Here is a link to a image of one.

http://www.goodmart.com/products/228694.htm

When I replaced my ceiling light with a ceiling fan, I had FIVE #12's to connect together (box was doubling as a junction box). I went and got some of those huge light blue wire nuts that are in a three pack for a couple of bucks at HD. That was no fun to install.

Next ceiling fan...same thing, FIVE #12's. I had picked up some of these gizmo's by Ideal, and used one of them this time. EASY! Oh, and a pack of 12 (variety pack) cost about the same as that three pack of those huge light blue wirenuts.

I am curious of what others opinions are of them. They seem to hold pretty well, but I know that the "backstabs" on outlets seem to as well, and I know better than to use them.
 
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