Rookie major mistake...

Reply

  #1  
Old 02-08-05, 06:10 AM
81Custom
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Rookie major mistake...

Hello,, I'm a rookie whos' tired of no-show contractors and tried to do as much wiring myself as I could. after running conduit in my new unattached garage, i mistakenly ran #12 braided wire. Do the connectors have to be soldered to the wires, or is the crimp enough to prevent arcing? Also, can I substitute shrink tubing for tape? I will NOT be hooking up the panel...I ain't that stupid to try...but do the wire ends at the panel need to be soldered for use with set screws in the bar? Thanks, and I wish I could find an electrician who'd show up...or at least call back.....
 
  #2  
Old 02-08-05, 08:39 AM
T
Member
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Chicago
Posts: 1,915
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
You could use crimp connectors...or you could simply use a short piece of solid wire and use a wire nut to connect the 2.
 
  #3  
Old 02-08-05, 11:02 AM
R
Member
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: NA
Posts: 1,065
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
No the wires dont need to be soldered to connect them to the neutral/ground bars and breakers in the panel. In fact you really didnt screw up at all, stranded wire is much preferred in conduit applications over solid wire. Use crimp on fork terminals for connecting to your receptacles and switches Or buy switches and receptacles that are "backwired", dont confuse this with backstabbed. Do you have the sub-panel set and feeder ran to it from the main panel at the House? (I am assuming you are feeding the sub-panel from your house main panel.) If you read this Linked article and maybe a few good home wiring books like "wiring simplified" (home depot) you should be able to do this yourself. Post back with your questions after reading up on what you are wanting to do.

http://www.selfhelpandmore.com/homew...rage/index.htm
 
  #4  
Old 02-08-05, 11:07 AM
W
Member
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Oregon
Posts: 1,219
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
1) This is oft repeated: Proper electrical wiring involves numerous details. Getting these details wrong will result in a system that 'works', but which may be less safe (perhaps substantially less safe) than ideal. There is no way that any of us sitting on the opposite side of the screen can know what _you_ don't know, and what _you_ don't know could kill you or a loved one. I _strongly_ urge you to borrow or buy 2 or 3 books on electrical wiring, and then read them. Not just the section that applies to the task at hand, but the whole thing. This reading will answer some of your questions, and lead you to several others. After you take the time to get the basic background, this forum will become much more useful to you.

2) I presume by 'braided' wire, you really mean 'stranded' wire. There are many forms of stranded wire suitable for electrical wiring. Look at the spools of wire that you used, if there are marked THHN or THWN (there may be other markings, eg. MTW; you can ignore these) then the wire is suitable as building wire.

3) _Do not_ solder the wire. Properly soldering building wire requires special tools and technique, and you have neither. Do it wrong and you will damage the insulation, not get a good joint, and probably start a fire.

4) There are numerous options for making splices with stranded wire.

Ordinary wire nuts will work, but you need to practise with them. The wire will easily get twisted up without being properly captured by the spring.

Buchanan makes crimp sleeve splices, and a tool to crimp them. I've used these, and find that they are really poor for solid wire, but work _great_ on stranded wire.
http://www.idealindustries.com/IDEAL...s?OpenDocument

Check the package for whatever splice you want to use. It will say if it is 'listed' for use with stranded wire. You make have to try out a few different splicing techniques, to find one that you are comfortable with. Just take several lengths of scrap wire, and make a bunch of splices...try pulling them apart, just get a feel for them, and see what seems best.

5) For terminations on devices, you also have a number of choices.

On things like receptacles and switches, buy the commercial grade devices that are 'back wire', or 'back and side wire'. These are not the cheap-o devices where you push a wire in through a hole, and a spring grabs it. These are the higher grade devices where a screw is used to clamp a pressure plate against the wire. You strip the wire to the proper length, push it into the proper hole, and tighten the screw. Works great on stranded wire.

Most GFCI receptacles are back and side wired...since you are wiring a garage, you'll probably be using GFCI receptacles anyway.

For devices with ordinary screw terminals, using stranded wire requires a bit of extra effort. What you want to avoid is having the screw head push the little strands of wire out around the edges.
Using your wire strippers, start stripping about 1.5" from the end of the wire. But don't pull the insulation all the way off. Instead expose about 1" of bare wire. You temporarily leave a tail of insulation to hold the strands together. Grab the end of the _wire_, still under the insulation, with your pliers, and _twist_ the end of the wire _tightly_ _counterclockwise_. For most people, twisting the wire counterclockwise feels 'backwards', but do it anyway. After you twist the wire, form your hook, then cut off the insulated 'tail'. You will now have a hook that won't come apart when you tighten the screw.
Be sure to practise this technique on some scrap wire.

5) I would not use shrink tube. Ordinary electrical tape is probably better for most wiring applications. I would use shrink tube for things like coding conductors.

-Jon
 
  #5  
Old 02-08-05, 04:39 PM
81Custom
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Thanks Fellows...

I think I'll go with the crimp forked connectors...and I WON'T solder any wire... and forget the tubing..I'm getting the GOOD tape( not the 10rolls for a dollar stuff) Yes, the sub feed is already connected from the house... I really thought I'd screwed up. Thanks again for your input,it will be put to task.
 
  #6  
Old 02-08-05, 05:19 PM
W
Member
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Oregon
Posts: 1,219
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
If you chose to use the crimp connectors, be sure to use good connectors and the proper tool listed for them. Here is a hint: the kits sold with a pressed sheet metal 'crimping' tool do a _very_ poor job.

The best crimp tools have a ratchet mechanism; as you squeeze them closed on a terminal, they will not open up again until the crimp is squeezed properly shut. Something such as: http://shop.store.yahoo.com/tmt/crimtooldies.html though you can find similar items cheaper.

-Jon
 
  #7  
Old 02-09-05, 06:33 AM
81Custom
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Originally Posted by winnie
If you chose to use the crimp connectors, be sure to use good connectors and the proper tool listed for them. Here is a hint: the kits sold with a pressed sheet metal 'crimping' tool do a _very_ poor job.

The best crimp tools have a ratchet mechanism; as you squeeze them closed on a terminal, they will not open up again until the crimp is squeezed properly shut. Something such as: http://shop.store.yahoo.com/tmt/crimtooldies.html though you can find similar items cheaper.

-Jon

I've found that cheaper is exactly what one gets.....cheaper.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: