wiring a 20amp dedicated circuit for hot tub

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  #1  
Old 02-10-05, 03:20 PM
kids041
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Question wiring a 20amp dedicated circuit for hot tub

I want to wire my hot tub to be on its own circuit. It has the GFCI plug on it. It is a 110v hot tub. What type of supplies do I need to do this project?
I had an electrictian come and give an estimate, but $500 is way out of my budget. I know a bit about electric wiring, and have some idea of what is going on, I have just never hard wired an outlet to its own circuit breaker. Any help would sure be appreciated.

PS we have been using this hot tub for about a year now, and recientally the breaker has started to trip a lot, and we do not want any fires... hence the help needed.

thanks again
 
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Old 02-10-05, 06:28 PM
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You need a 20-amp breaker of the make and model appropriate for your panel, a length of 12/2 NM-B cable (if your city doesn't require conduit), some cable staples, a drill to bore some holes, perhaps some drywall patch materials, an electrical box, some tools such as wire and cable strippers, and three books on home wiring, read cover to cover.
 
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Old 02-10-05, 06:53 PM
kids041
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thanks for your answer... I am in the works of acquiring the home wiring books now.
 
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Old 02-12-05, 02:03 PM
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also if the Hot Tub is outside you may have to consider 12-2 UF....sad to say all the ones we wire up are 60 Amp puppies......I sure could use a few 20 amp models over the past few weeks...lol

Good Luck...if you need any questions answered just post !
 
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Old 02-12-05, 03:59 PM
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If the hot tub is outside you cannot use 12-2. You must use individual conductors, as the ground wire cannot be bare.
 
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Old 02-12-05, 05:31 PM
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You can if you are supplying a receptable as in my post.....and using a plug and cord setup. He can simply do it that way but I have never done any direct control panel setups on a 20A....always a plug in cord around here for 20A setups....we are used to doing mainly the 60A deals...

Take my Spa/Hot tub......8' x 8' and 60 amps.....
 
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Old 02-12-05, 05:39 PM
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Racraft...Post the article on that in the 1999 NEC..I would like to review it !

Based on the post and reply by the moderator the question was to a recep. thus he mod said to make sure and get a electrical box...I would assume waterproof if outside...anyway I see tons of them every day with 12-2 UF run to a waterproof box on GFCI and a 15' or less cord and plug setup for the small 20A spas......

So please provide me with the location that says it cant be done that way for the 1999 code.....because I am gonna make a bundle replacing them if that is the case and need to inform the local inspectors as they seem to pass them all the time....as long as the plug is GFCI...nothing says it can't be 12-2UF to the recep.....and spa is a simply plug and cord and many small units come that way already....set up.

I was just really giving him a option if the unit is outside is all...and I would not think it would be a direct wire for a 20A...again I could be wrong but being my family owns a spa company ( PDC SPA's Dealer ) I have not seen any.
 

Last edited by ElectricalMan; 02-12-05 at 05:52 PM.
  #8  
Old 02-12-05, 06:55 PM
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ElectricalMan,

I do not have a copy of the NEC. I am going by printed information I have regarding swimming pools, and what I was told when I had my pool inspected.

My understanding is that:

Pools and spas are subject to the same rules and regulations. That is permanently installed ones, portable spas are apparently a different animal.

The equipment grounding wire must be insulated and in conduit once it leaves the residence. Further, the motor and any metal must be bonded together.

The inspector who inspected my pool did not have a valid reason for requiring the insulated ground (other than the fact that it was code).

There are the other rules as well, regarding the distance from the pump to the edge of the pool or spa, and the presence of a convenience receptacle, etc., and of course the GFCI necessity.
 
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Old 02-13-05, 05:41 AM
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ElectricalMan,

1999 NEC
Article 680-40 refers us to 680-25(c), where an insulated EGC is required once you leave the interior of the dwelling.

2002 NEC
The requirement is found in 680.21(A)(1) and 680.21(A)(4)
 
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Old 02-13-05, 08:43 AM
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I interpret NEC 2002 680.42 to allow the bare EGC enclosed within the sheath for the application Electrical Man is refering to..

(C) Interior Wiring to Outdoor Installations. In the interior of a one-family dwelling or in the interior of another building or structure associated with a one-family dwelling, any of the wiring methods recognized in Chapter 3 of this Code that contain a copper equipment grounding conductor that is insulated or enclosed within the outer sheath of the wiring method and not smaller than 12 AWG shall be permitted to be used for the connection to motor, heating, and control loads that are part of a self-contained spa or hot tub, or a packaged spa or hot tub equipment assembly.
 
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