Aluminum wire and new range

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  #1  
Old 02-15-05, 11:50 AM
cautious
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Aluminum wire and new range

I just pulled my 1968 kitchen stove to find what appears to be multi-strand aluminum wire. I have seen threads here that say it is safe to hook the new stove to aluminum wire. Will you please confirm if it is safe to do so and tell me how to proceed? The help desk at the appliance company started by saying the stove only requires 30 amps and ended by saying my 40-amp circuit was "fine". This makes me a little uncomfortable with their advice.

I do not see anything on the light gray sheathing to confirm the wire is 40 amp. I have a red, a black and a bare. The original stove was hard wired. Should I hard wire or (ideally) add a plug and a receptacle? The stove company wants the receptacle to be within 6 inches of the floor, but the wire comes out of the wall two feet above the floor and the wire extends only eight inches from the wall. If you recommend a plug and receptacle, should I add length to the wire or put the receptacle two feet above the floor? Thank you.
 
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  #2  
Old 02-15-05, 11:58 AM
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does your cable come in from overhead or from under the floor. The reason they want the recep near the floor is because the back of the stove is set in near the bottom, enabling you to slide the stove against the wall. what size fuse/ breaker is in your panel for the stove??
 
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Old 02-15-05, 12:11 PM
cautious
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The wire comes in from overhead and the breaker is 40 amp.
 
  #4  
Old 02-15-05, 12:26 PM
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I assume the stove is a freestanding or slide in stove, not a wall mount. Check the owners manual, if its cord connected it will require a recep. If you want to put it down near the floor as is suggested you will need to set a j-box inside the wall and join another cable in the box, If it's a metal box make sure you ground it. I'm assuming again your cable size is #6. If so the j box must be at least 30 cu in., 35 if clamps are internal. I would use split bolts to splice the cables, If you are attaching cu wire make sure you use the cu to al split bolts that have a bar that separates the 2 wires . I would suggest an electrician if you want to extend the circuit, or run a new circuit if feasible.
 
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Old 02-15-05, 12:39 PM
cautious
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I'll make a trip to the parts dept and call a pro if it looks like it's too much for me. Thank you for your time!
 
  #6  
Old 02-16-05, 07:55 AM
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Just to comment on the AL wire......it should be fine as many still use Aluminum for ranges....atleast we do in VA.....

However, Jedi is right as I would install a J-Box in the wall and run a new cable to a surface mount range recep below...should be easy to fish down once you make the hole for the J-Box above it and with a blank cover plate on the j-Box it will be fine.

Hmmm...I get 25 cu in as the min for # 6 (2) Blk (2) Red (1) Gnd as they count as one....and yes if any internal cable clamps you have to add for them as well ( 5.00...See Art 370-16 (b) if again using # 6 and the wire in the wall is as such... But just get a external clamping device for the conductor if you are worried.

However, you should be able to do this with a Non-Metalic and I would suggest a 4 x2 1/8 ( allows 6 # 6's ) or a 4 11/16 x 2 1/8 ( allows 8 # 6's) and a blank cover.

Good luck....let us know how it goes
 
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