Extra outlets needed in bedroom

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  #1  
Old 02-27-05, 03:47 PM
archcommus
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Extra outlets needed in bedroom

Hello everyone.

My house was built in 1948. The kitchen and bathroom have new wiring and the rest is original, i.e. rat-proof coiled wires in the basement and two-prong outlets. As you might expect, my bedroom only has one outlet on one wall, the other three have none. This has never been too much of an issue as I don't do much in my bedroom but sleep. However, this fall I'll be going to college and my dad will continue to use his computer where ours is set up now, in the basement. Whenever I'm home from college for long enough to take my computer home with me, I will need another place in the house to set it up. The house is small, so really the only options are another part of the basement or my bedroom. I'd prefer it in my bedroom, but obviously additional outlets will be needed, at least one on each of the three walls that have none, and of course the one that's already there would need to be updated to a grounded outlet.

So would the first step be to find out if the one outlet that's already there is on its own circuit or not? If it is not, then another circuit would need to be ran from the box in the basement, and that is definitely not a DIY job for myself, and would probably cost too much money.
 
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  #2  
Old 02-27-05, 04:22 PM
robertnb64
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Most likely the plug there is not on its own, but with the other plugs in the house. While not a diy project if you have n experience with electrical, it should be very easy for a licensed electrion to add a new plug, and not too much monet either.
 
  #3  
Old 02-27-05, 08:12 PM
archcommus
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But like you said, the one outlet already in the room is probably NOT on its own circuit, meaning since I want at least three more outlets another circuit would have to be ran from the circuit breaker box.

Would that not get sort of pricey?

I would probably also just use surface conduit in the room instead of ripping open the walls.
 
  #4  
Old 02-28-05, 09:21 AM
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College is a time for learning. Visit your library and type "home wiring" into the word search. Check out three books. What you learn from them will serve you well not only in this case, but for the rest of your life. Like most areas of life, things only seem hard until you learn how and do them for the first time--then they are easy as pie. And don't be tempted by surface conduit. This goofy solution is a false friend-- it only seems attractive right now because you don't yet know how to fish the wires through the walls. But you will. It'll be very satisfying.
 
  #5  
Old 02-28-05, 12:56 PM
archcommus
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But we're talking about 57-year-old wiring, and not only that but probably having to run a completely new circuit from the breaker box.

Don't you think it'd be unwise for someone who has never done ANY electrical project to attempt?
 
  #6  
Old 02-28-05, 01:05 PM
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If you think it is unwise, then it is. If you learn enough such that you no longer think it is unwise, then it's not (unless you are an overconfident guy, which it seems that you are not).
 
  #7  
Old 03-01-05, 07:01 AM
Jwichman
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Very good advice from Mr. Nelson. This electrical stuff is niether magic nor rocket science. With the help of a couple of cheap, easy reading books and some great advice from this forum, I just completed an entire re-wiring of my basement and discovered a couple of other problems to fix along the way. Turns out the most difficult part of the whole thing was getting those stiff wires crammed into those little boxes.

Get the books, ask the questions, do it yourself, and get the satisfaction.
 
  #8  
Old 03-01-05, 06:31 PM
archcommus
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Well I don't know. I understand fully what you are saying about the satisfaction of doing it myself, I just don't want a mess that I regret getting myself into.

I'm really afraid I'd make a mess out of my walls, with cutting them opening and then plastering them back up.

If I happened to hire an electrician, would he do that part, as well? I imagine he would, not like he'd tell me to do that myself and then call him back when I have the wall open.

And finally...I know it's hard to judge without seeing it, but if I did happen to hire someone to do this, can you give me ANY sort of range as to the sort of prices I might be looking at? Again, the project would probably involve running a new circuit from the breaker box up to a second-floor bedroom, and adding approximately four new outlets in that room, as well as replacing the one outlet that's already there.

I don't know what to expect here, are we talking a couple hundred dollars or something over $500 or more?
 
  #9  
Old 03-01-05, 06:48 PM
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Electricians are good at making holes--not so good at patching them up. The better the electrician, the fewer holes he will make--maybe none.

You're probably looking at something over $200 but less than $500.
 
  #10  
Old 03-01-05, 08:12 PM
archcommus
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I think I could handle something in the few hundred dollar range.

As an adult, with my own home, and more time, yes, I would be very willing to learn and to take on a small project myself. But with my senior year of high school wrapping up and all, I have very limited free time, and combined with it not being a house I own myself and with this large of a project, I think it's better left to a professional.

Thanks for the help everyone.
 
  #11  
Old 03-10-05, 02:20 PM
archcommus
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*UPDATE*

So I got the quote today, it came to $425. The description reads "FURNISH AND INSTALL (4) NEW RECEPTACLES WITH (1) NEW CIRCUIT." Seems reasonable to go ahead with it, I suppose. Only problem is, I mentioned at least twice while the guy was here taking a look last week that I also wanted the one and only two-prong outlet already in the room replaced, as well. As you can see, that is not in the description. I know replacing a receptacle is probably very very little work, but considering it will need grounded, too, how much more do you think that could increase the cost?
 
  #12  
Old 03-10-05, 03:27 PM
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I'd leave the existing receptacle alone. Messing with it requires messing with a second circuit, and that's not very cost effective. If four receptacles isn't enough, have him add five. Adding a fifth to the new circuit is probably easier than doing something with the existing one. If necessary, put the fifth new receptacle right next to that old one.
 
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