Setting up home network

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  #1  
Old 03-04-05, 04:51 AM
DanS19
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Setting up home network

I have a Comcast cable internet connection that I would like to use for multiple computers and a Sony playstation. I have cable outlets in all rooms. Can I put a router and modem on the cable connection to the home and network via the existing cable lines, with adapters for ethernet or usb to the devices?
 
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  #2  
Old 03-04-05, 04:57 AM
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I have never heard of adapters that allow you to use cable lines as Ethernet connections. I have heard of adapters for electric lines, but never for cable lines.

I suggest that you either run cat 5e, or that you invest in wireless equipment.
 
  #3  
Old 03-04-05, 08:05 AM
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No.

As racraft suggested, you need to either run UTP cable to each device for wired ethernet or buy an 802.11 wireless ethernet router and put wireless cards in your PCs. I know that XBOX has a wireless adapter available, but I'm not sure about Playstation. You may need wired ethernet for the playstation. Also, you don't really need to mess with jacks and patch panels; you can just buy 50ft patch cables and run them along baseboards, through walls, under rugs, or whereever else they're hidden. The solution isn't as elegant, but it gets the job done.
 
  #4  
Old 03-04-05, 09:52 AM
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Take a look at this website:

http://www.coaxsys.com/products_purespeed.htm

I know nothing about this company or product, but it looks like it addresses your situation.
 
  #5  
Old 03-04-05, 10:11 AM
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Looks expensive. One adapter per connection, plus the hub. I wouldn't do it.
 
  #6  
Old 03-04-05, 10:45 AM
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Originally Posted by racraft
Looks expensive. One adapter per connection, plus the hub. I wouldn't do it.
Whoa, quick rush to judgement there, pretty much the same amount of hardware as wireless (access point plus wireless cards)...

Actually looking into it more I think the Coaxsys stuff may not even be on the market yet, I can't find a vendor...

If cheap enough it would be an elegant solution to the problem, much higher bandwidth than wireless especially if multiple computers....
 
  #7  
Old 03-04-05, 10:51 AM
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I am running two desk tops and one wireless laptop with the following cable modem.

Toshiba PCX 2500 cable modem into a Linksys WRT54GS 2.4 GHz Wireless G
(802.11g) Broadband Router.

The Router has four USB ports and a modem connection. Two of the ports are for the deskstop and the wireless is for the laptop that I use outside and downstairs.

Here is a link to the router info where you can see the ports on the back.

http://www.linksys.com/products/prod...id=35&prid=601
 
  #8  
Old 03-04-05, 11:51 AM
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Originally Posted by mikewu99
...pretty much the same amount of hardware as wireless (access point plus wireless cards)...

Wrong. With this possible coax setup, each PC needs a wired ethernet network card, plus the adapter. With a straight wireless or wired network, each PC only needs a network card (either wireless or wired).
 
  #9  
Old 03-04-05, 12:17 PM
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I should add that both desktop computers are in the same room as the Router.
 
  #10  
Old 03-06-05, 07:26 AM
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Originally Posted by racraft
Wrong. With this possible coax setup, each PC needs a wired ethernet network card, plus the adapter. With a straight wireless or wired network, each PC only needs a network card (either wireless or wired).
Any reasonably recent vintage PC has ethernet built into it already.

racraft, have I offended you in any way? Your replies to my posts on this thread seem rather abrupt and I'm not sure why.
 
  #11  
Old 03-06-05, 10:02 AM
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You could do it, if you can find some old network cards that use coax (thinnet, thicknet, something like that), performance wouldn't be as good as current ethernet, but would let you use your existing cabling.

Use to have some old Intel cards that had ethernet, coax and UTP connectors on them, they weren't cheap (at the time), at around $120 each, where straight ethernet cards now are less than $20
 
  #12  
Old 03-06-05, 12:08 PM
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mikewu99,

You have not offended me. I do not easily get offended.

My answers are short because there is not much need to go into further detail.
 
  #13  
Old 03-06-05, 07:04 PM
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You could in principle use those Coax cables and make a 10Base2 network, but it's not a very elegant solution, and it's probably not going to work very well, if at all.

The best solution for your problem would be a hard wired Cat5 nework to a central location, probably the basement. The next best thing would be a wireless network, but if you have a big house you may run into problems.
 
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Old 03-06-05, 07:07 PM
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After thinking about it a bit more I realised my proposed solution to use the existing RG6 cable won't work. 10Base2 networks use a daisy chain configuration, you would need the cable wiring to be daisy chanied for this to work.
 
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Old 03-07-05, 04:16 AM
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The RG6 wouldn't work for 10Base 2 no matter what you do with it, as the cables necessary for 10Base 2 are quite different...
 
  #16  
Old 03-07-05, 06:10 AM
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Cable for 10base2 is 50 ohm characteristic impedance, RG-6 is 75 ohms so you are doomed before you start.

FWIW I have both hardwired ethernet (for desktops, printers, and audio players) and wireless (for laptops) in my house. The wireless would probably work fine most of the time, but the audio players are very sensitive to network congestion. The trick with the wireless is installing the access point in the right location - it took some trial and error before I found a good place for mine.
 
  #17  
Old 03-07-05, 07:46 PM
zenmasterj
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cat 5e

Cat5e cable is really easy to run, and you can get keystone jacks so you don't have to crimp them. RP electronics (www.rpelectronics.com) has the jacks and www.geeks.com has a cheap cat5e cable/crimper/connectors package ($18 for 300ft). I did it in my house, then just installed a router/switch combination at a central location to connect all of them to my cable modem.
 
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