dedicated circuit vs. shared circuit

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  #1  
Old 03-04-05, 07:56 AM
willowonyx
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dedicated circuit vs. shared circuit

My husband and I are going to do all the electrical wiring in the unfinished basement of our new house ourselves. And we have a question.

Grant it that the regular 110V outlets will be run from the regular circuit breaker panel. What does a dedicated circuit require, from A to Z?

Let me know if you need further clarification. Thanks.
 
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  #2  
Old 03-04-05, 08:09 AM
R
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The only difference between a dedicated circuit and a shared circuit is that a dedicated circuit is for a single load and a shared circuit is meant to be shared between more than one load.

My refrigerator has a dedicated circuit. It is the only load on that circuit. My freezer has a dedicated circuit. It is the only load on that circuit. I can say the same thing about my sump pump, my washer, my dryer, my water heater, my furnace and perhaps other items in my residence.

The wiring for these appliances goes directly from the panel to the receptacle serving the appliance, or in some cases directly into the appliance.

However, that definition for dedicated can be misleading.

For example, in my finished basement I have lighting. It is a 15 amp circuit. There is nothing else on this circuit except for the lights in the basement. You could say that this circuit is dedicated to the finished basement lighting.

What is it that you are thinking you want a dedicated circuit for?
 
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Old 03-04-05, 11:02 AM
willowonyx
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It will hold the load of the home theater equipment. Since it drains so much, we do not want it combined with anything else.

So, if we want to install a 20amp outlet for that equipment, we can just wire it directly to the panel. No additional or seperate panel is needed?
 
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Old 03-04-05, 11:13 AM
R
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That's right. Run one 12-2 cable from the panel to the receptacle junction box. Use a standard 15 or 20 amp duplex receptacle.
 
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Old 03-04-05, 11:15 AM
willowonyx
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Perfect. Thank you!!!!!!
 
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Old 03-04-05, 12:24 PM
J
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You might want to consider running 12/3 multiwire circuit. That would give you two 20 amp circuits at the home theater.
 
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Old 03-05-05, 03:38 AM
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Another thought:

Consider the dedicated ckt with a 2 gang box and 2 receptacles. While there is still only the home theater equipment that will be used on this ckt, a common problem is not enough outlets to plug stuff into...
 
  #8  
Old 03-06-05, 12:31 PM
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Someone spending money on a home theater system doesn't want to use both receptacles in a duplex receptacle, they want to install a decent surge suppressor, which will have it's own receptacles.
 
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