208-240V Computer Equipment

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  #1  
Old 03-04-05, 03:29 PM
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208-240V Computer Equipment

Greetings:

I am considering buying a computer UPS system for a home business that requires input voltage of 208V to 240V as per the manufacturer's specs. At my location, I have a standard residential 240V split phase service.

This device has a 2-prong plug with ground, and it seems that it is intended to be installed as a phase-to-phase device in a location with 3-phase power. Is safe and code legal to install this device at my location using a DP breaker? To clarify, the UPS would be connected with 2 hots, a ground, and no neutral.

I suspect the answer is no, and the 240V rating is probably for international uses, but I thought I'd check. I can always continue my search for a different device which accepts US residential 240V. Thanks!
 

Last edited by ibpooks; 03-04-05 at 03:53 PM.
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  #2  
Old 03-04-05, 04:33 PM
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It has specs of 208 to 240 volts. Your home power is 240 volts. I see no problem using it in a home.
 
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Old 03-04-05, 06:15 PM
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I was thinking that the lack of neutral was the problem, not the 240V. Any thoughts?
 
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Old 03-04-05, 06:26 PM
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240 has NO neutral. This is a very common misconception.
 
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Old 03-04-05, 06:46 PM
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ibpooks,

I see by your location that you are in the US and wonder what you will do with a 240 volt UPS.
The normal usage for these devices is for electronics, usually computers and units produced for North America are 120 volts.

What exactly will you be connecting to this UPS?
 
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Old 03-04-05, 06:53 PM
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I believe I can answer for him.
A UPS can have a 240 volt feed on the line side and one or more 120 volt supplies on the output side.
 
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Old 03-04-05, 07:02 PM
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So do you see any problem installing a dedicated circuit for this UPS using 10/2 NM-B with a NEMA L6-30R type receptacle and a 30 amp DP breaker? The run length is less than 20 feet.

Regarding the equipment, I use a substantial number of high performance computers running 24x7 (processing farm), which have about a 5% efficiency boost on 240V over 120V. Over a few months the energy savings makes the initial 240V installation worthwhile.
 
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Old 03-04-05, 07:59 PM
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Ah, ok, thanks. That explains it.

I didn't understand what the talk about neutral conductors was about.
 
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Old 03-05-05, 08:15 AM
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Use the breaker size specified by the manufacturer. So only use the 30-amp breaker if that's what the UPS manufacturer says to use.
 
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Old 03-05-05, 08:27 AM
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It specifies 30A dedicated branch circuit, so everything sounds okay. Thanks!
 
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