Garbage Disposal Line:

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  #1  
Old 03-10-05, 08:00 AM
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Garbage Disposal Line:

Continuing my program of daily torture and abuse...uh, I mean my kitchen remodeling project...under the direction of the slave master...uh, I mean the general contractor, my wife...I'm installing a new sink and garbage disposal.

I have it on a separate 20 amp breaker, using the normal 12/2 NM-B with ground wire that I've been using in the rest of the kitchen. It's coming from the switch above the counter, exiting through the wall under the sink about level with the disposal. I just drilled a hole in the wall and fished it through, nothing fancy.

Now a friend tells me that this is NOT a good way to do it, that this type of wire should NOT be used in this type of insulation.

True or false?

If incorrect, what's the most efficient way to correct this? Thanks!
 
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  #2  
Old 03-10-05, 08:13 AM
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There are two ways to wire a disposal. Use a cord and plug or direct connect the disposal to the ac.

Some disposals come with a cord and plug attached. Mine did. Others do not. Often, you can install a cord and plug and then simply plug the disposal into a switched receptacle.

The issue with directly connecting the disposal is that the wire must be protected. NM type wire is supposed to be protected. I am not going to pass judgment on whether NM run from the wall to the disposal is protected. Some would argue that it isn't, others would argue that it is.

Here is what I would do. Install a junction box under the sink. Use an old work box and just use the existing hole in the wall (okay, you'll have to make it larger to hold the old work box.

Then, if you can, install a cord and plug on the disposal. Install a receptacle on the old work box and be done with it.

If you can't install, a cord and plug, then use bx cable to go from the junction box to the disposal. They make cover plates for the junction box for this purpose.
 
  #3  
Old 03-10-05, 08:17 AM
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I prefer cord-and-plug disposals. So if your disposal came with a cord and plug, I'd install a receptacle for it.

Otherwise, I think I'd just buy a short section of flex conduit and slip it over the NM cable where it is exposed.
 
  #4  
Old 03-10-05, 08:19 AM
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old,

I am not sure in the 2002 or 2005 if this has changed but basically on all the homes we do we do as you are refering to and simply direct wire the disposal.

Now you can turn it into a Plug and Cord style and simply mount a box under the cabinet as listed in the reply from rac and it most certainly would be fine.

For us based on the position of the wire and the piping and so on we look at it as protected fine...really more protected than running Romax on the wall in a basement which is allowed also....so we personally never had a issue with it.

Rac is right......some inspectors may say you need to protect it, heck if that happens just get some ENT and sleeve the NM-B and you would be fine but I dont think it would come up as a issue unless it was addressed in the new 2002 and 2005 which we in VA have not adopted as of yet.

The direct connect saves time and if you tape the NM-B to the pipe and kinda secure it you should be fine.
 
  #5  
Old 03-10-05, 10:45 AM
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Thanks for the replies:

I think I'll go with buying some flex conduit and slipping it over the 12/2.

Personally, installing a box under the sink and plugging the disposal into it seems LESS secure than other options. To many people getting and putting things under there, seems like the plug could be pulled out totally or partially at any time.
 
  #6  
Old 03-10-05, 11:22 AM
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Both my disposal and my dishwasher plug in under my sink. The receptacle (a duplex) is located directly behind the disposal. Because of the size of the disposal, the plugs aren't in the way. Neither have ever accidentally been unplugged.
 
  #7  
Old 03-10-05, 12:18 PM
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Actually Bob, having the dishwasher plug in under the sink violates today's codes restricting dishwasher cord length. But it may have been okay at the time it was installed.
 
  #8  
Old 03-10-05, 12:58 PM
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John,

It was that way when we moved in, so it's nothing I did.

I realize that by today's code the plug needs to be behind the dishwasher. When did this get added to the code? What is the concern?

I'm also stuck on how difficult this would be to plug in if the plug were right behind the unit. As it stands now, the water line, drain line, and power cord for the dishwasher pass through the sink base to the area at the back of the dishwasher.
 
  #9  
Old 03-10-05, 03:38 PM
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Darn if I know what the concern is. I'm sure it's because of some injury or fire somewhere.
 
  #10  
Old 03-10-05, 04:09 PM
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I think it had to do with possibly damaging the cord if it's under the sink. People store all kinds of stuff in there (present company included).
 
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