2 breakers for 1 outlet?

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  #1  
Old 11-20-01, 09:15 AM
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  #2  
Old 03-19-05, 01:54 PM
drgonzo
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2 breakers for 1 outlet?

First off, i am very much a novice. I was replacing a GFI outlet in my kitchen just for the purpose of having a white one isntead of the old brown one for are newly repainted kitchen. I turned the breaker off and tested the outlet to make sure it was off, which it was. Connected to it was one black, one white and a ground. However there was a 4th red wire that was capped off. This wire was still hot, whici i found out on accident. Turns out that wire is contoled by the breaker next to the other. All 4 wires are in one black sheath, or whatever the proper term for that is. Now, is this normal? I wouldnt think so but im no electrician. And if its not is there a problem leaving it capped off or what should i do?
 
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Old 03-19-05, 01:56 PM
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Its probably there for a future circuit. Just cap it the way it was before
 
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Old 03-19-05, 01:58 PM
drgonzo
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interesting, is it odd or not to have wires all from one "wire" be connected to different breakers. This is an old house as well.
 
  #5  
Old 03-19-05, 02:54 PM
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There are lots of possible explanations.

This is a multiwire circuit. They were very common in kitchens (especially in Canada) before GFCI requirements came along. Because GFCI and multiwire don't coexist very well, the multiwire is often abandoned or modified when GFCI is added.

Are you in Canada, and/or was your house built before 1971?
 
  #6  
Old 03-21-05, 11:49 AM
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Unless the circuit is protected by a 20 amp breaker and the wiring is 12/3, you can not just disconnect the second leg of the multiwire circuit to install a CFI. It would not meet code in Canada, (or, I am guessing, the US?). If the circuit is15 amp multiwire, it must be protected by a dual pole CFI breaker. Which is expensive.

BTW, if he is in Canada, a CFI is only required if the outlet is within 1 m of the sink.
 
  #7  
Old 03-21-05, 12:01 PM
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In the US, disconnecting the second half of a multiwire would not violate any codes by itself. Doing so would enable you to install a GFCI receptacle.
 
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