Receptacle wiring & pigtails

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  #1  
Old 04-11-05, 08:44 AM
markroy
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Receptacle wiring & pigtails

When wiring a receptacle in a box in which I have one wire that supplies power and another that feeds the next receptacle in the circuit, is it "ok" connect both sets of wires to the receptacle as a means to power the receptacle and connect the in and out feeds? Or, should I use wirenuts and pigtails, just connecting the pigtail to the receptacle?

In the same situation, but with two receptacles, can I "jump" power from one receptacle to the other? Or, should I pigtail connect those?

In either case, the ground must always be pigtailed (correct?).
 
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  #2  
Old 04-11-05, 09:29 AM
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Location: Fayetteville, NY, USA
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It is perfectly acceptable to "feed through" a receptacle to power the downstream receptacles. It is also acceptable to pigtail the hots and neutrals if you wish, but not required. Even for just two receptacles.

You are correct about the grounds. They must be pigtailed. Also, if you have metallic boxes, the box must be grounded by one of the ground wires.

Juice
 
  #3  
Old 04-11-05, 10:05 AM
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Yes, you can feed through for other receptacles. However, there are several caveats.

Most people that answer questions here recommend that you NOT use the spring type back stab connections, as they tend to fail over time.

You may only connect one wire around/under a screw terminal. If the screw holds down a metal plate behind which you insert the wire than you can have two wires behind the plate.

If you have a multi wire circuit then you must use pigtails on the neutral. The neutral may not feed through.
 
  #4  
Old 04-11-05, 10:35 AM
markroy
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I suppose I should know this, but what do you mean by "a multi wire circuit"
 
  #5  
Old 04-11-05, 10:40 AM
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He is referring to two 120v circuits in a single cable, such at 12/3 w/ground Romex. Or 3#12s + ground in conduit, of course. This is an arrangement that provides two separate 120v circuits which each has its own hot and both circuits share a neutral. It is often used where two circuits are being provided for one room. It makes the home run simpler and less expensive. The two circuits are on separate breakers.

Hope that helps.

Juice
 
  #6  
Old 04-11-05, 02:06 PM
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I believe what is being discussed in this thread is not a multiwire circuit.
 
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