Kitchen GFCI questions

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  #1  
Old 04-17-05, 07:19 PM
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Kitchen GFCI questions

I would like to replace the standard outlet next to my kitchen sink with a GFCI outlet for added safety. One issue I have though is the last outlet on the circuit is the outlet I have my fridge plugged into. I'd rather not have that last outlet on the circuit to have GCFI protection in case of an accidental trip.

Any suggestions?
 
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  #2  
Old 04-17-05, 07:32 PM
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First, make sure that the receptacle is not already GFCI protected by a GFCI upstream. If it is, then you need do nothing. Then you can put a GFCI there, but using only the line-side connections (and not the load-side connections) and then you won't risk spoiled food if the GFCI trips. If the GFCI receptacle offers only one set of line-side connections, then you'll need two wire nuts and two pigtail wires to make the connections.
 
  #3  
Old 04-17-05, 07:40 PM
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Originally Posted by John Nelson
Then you can put a GFCI there, but using only the line-side connections (and not the load-side connections) and then you won't risk spoiled food if the GFCI trips. If the GFCI receptacle offers only one set of line-side connections, then you'll need two wire nuts and two pigtail wires to make the connections.
So, to make sure I understand this correctly, if I wire the downstream outlets to the line-side connections instead of the load-side connections then the only outlet to have GFCI protection is that particular outlet itself?
 
  #4  
Old 04-17-05, 07:40 PM
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When you install the GFCI outlet, connect the blacks to a pigtail, and connect it to the LINE side gold screw. Similarly connect the whites to the LINE side silver screw. Finally the grounds to the green.

Do not connect anything to the LOAD screws. They are for "downstream" protection of other devices, which you do not want. Using only the LINE screws provides GFCI protection at this outlet only, so tripping the GFCI only kills this one outlet.

Note1: If you want GFCI protection at other outlets on this circuit, you will need to install a GFCI at each one this same way.

Note2: There is a very good chance that the box the outlet in question is installed in is small, and that this install, especially with the need for three wirenuts, will make for a very cramped, hard to work with box. This could very well be a problem for you.
 
  #5  
Old 04-17-05, 07:47 PM
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With the power off, remove the existing recepticle from the box. Disconnect the ground, if there is one, and connect to the ground screw on the GFCI recepticle. remove the white wires from the recep. and connect to the "marked" white side terminal Identified as "line." Repeat with the colored connductors opposite of the white.

Connect nothing to the load terminals.

Carefully fold the conductors back into the box and secure the GFCI, energize, push the reset button in, it wil click, and test the installation.
 
  #6  
Old 04-17-05, 08:24 PM
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Ok, thanks for the replies everyone. I always thought the downstream had to be connected to the load terminals.

Now I have another question just out of curiosity. Is there a potential for problems by having multiple GFCI protection or is it just simply redundant? For example, Lets say a GFCI circuit breaker is installed and a GFCI outlet is installed on that same circuit.
 
  #7  
Old 04-17-05, 08:51 PM
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Using the breaker protects the entire circuit, however, there is a limit to the number of recepticles permitted on that breaker. In your case, you refer.
would be on the circuit and the cycling of the compressor would usually cause it to trip.
You can protect any recepticle individualy.
 
  #8  
Old 04-18-05, 04:25 AM
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"there is a limit to the number of recepticles permitted on that breaker."

This is incorrect.

There is no limit to the number of receptacles that are allowed on any residential circuit and na GFCI breaker will protect each and every one of them.
 
  #9  
Old 04-20-05, 04:08 PM
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Originally Posted by racraft
"there is a limit to the number of recepticles permitted on that breaker."

This is incorrect.

There is no limit to the number of receptacles that are allowed on any residential circuit and na GFCI breaker will protect each and every one of them.
I stand corrected and will amend the statement.
The electric code is ambiguous and open to interpretation as to the number of receptacles permitted to be singularly protected by a gfi breaker. The consensus of opinion of 18 building officials from 11 different local municipalities is that, from practical experience, installing more than five protected receptacles expotentialy increases the breakers failure rate, by the simple act of plugging a device into the sixth or others numerically greater.

I protect only two receptacles.
 
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